Where is Viasat 2 from my location

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  • Updated 11 months ago
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How do I calculate the the position in the sky of Viasat 2 from to my lat and long
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John Rothgeb

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Posted 11 months ago

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computer1949

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Download MITe application form apple App store or Google play store
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wm4bama, Champion

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This is the info available on Vsat-2...click the various links provided on this page and see if you get any useful data:

https://www.satbeams.com/satellites?id=2676
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wm4bama, Champion

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Using info from above link all that is needed is the satellite's name (or its "longitude"), and any installation address worldwide.

http://www.groundcontrol.com/Satellite_Look_Angle_Calculator.htm
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Old Labs (VS1-329)

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Try http://www.n2yo.com/?s=42740 - you can customize your location and will provide azimuth and elevation , but beware it hasn't reached it's final resting place in orbit just yet although it's pretty close by the looks of that site.

Alternately, you can get an estimate at http://www.dishpointer.com/ - use the 70 W Star One C2 | Start One C4 statellite as a point of reference - it's right next door to where ViaSat-2 will be at 69.9W.

From another thread you appear to be in CA, beware that the elevation angle from there is probably going to be your biggest concern - approximately 25 degrees or so - might be problematic in mountainous areas (valleys), heavily forested areas, etc.
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J&J

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22-25 degrees in California... that's about 4 minutes on a clock, just as an easy way to visualize the elevation above the flat horizon. 
Another concern for us in Calif. is storms.  With the dish looking so low on the horizon, the signal isn't just looking through the thickness of storms, it is also looking through the horizontal spread of storms.  This is why when there is a big storm in the Pacific, I see Viasat switches the ground station in control of beam 369 from Hawaii to Southern California?,  as well as the other beams the Hawaii station serves.  When there is a big storm to the south-east of California, someone on VS-2 can't switch to another satellite, they're just out until the storm passes.
 
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Yes. Viasat-2 has a very low angle on the left coast and even worse in the Pacific northwest. But for a satellite designed to cover the Atlantic and carribean too, that is one reason why it is where it is.
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John Rothgeb

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Use the Geostationary Satellite Azimuth And Elevation Calculator

Link: http://www.csgnetwork.com/geosatposca...