ViaSat-2 Launch Date

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  • Updated 5 months ago
  • Planned
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Old Labs

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Posted 1 year ago

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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Hi Old Labs,  Thanks for sharing this information!
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Rick Fields

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Didn't know I was opening a video in that link. Just used up my whole month of data! :)
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Old Labs

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Sorry about that. A reminder of just how pervasive HTML5 video is becoming and it impacts our data usage on nearly every web site we visit.

Didn't impact me due to FireFox, AdBlock and Flash Control.   
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Tanya Béaugez Rivers

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please explain to me how to use FIREFOX, ADBLOCK, FLASH CONTROL to help save my data???
please please :) 
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xode0000, Champion

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The screenshots at http://techccu.com/users/compwiz/pictures/getsatisfaction-forum/thread1/InitialSetupStepsAfterInstal... should be helpful in showing you how to tell firefox to not burn up data.

After you have told firefox how to be more frugal with your data, you can install adblock from https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/adblock-plus/ and flash control from https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/flash-control/
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Alex, Viasat Corporate Communications

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Yep, launch date is April 25 (give or take a day or three depending on weather and other factors). We can't wait!
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Michael Wood

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Thanks for the replies, but I guess this means VOIP (magicJack) performance will not be improved with new satellite. Quite disappointing news. Several months ago, when I first learned of ViaSat's plan to launch a new satellite, I thought that meant the problems with VOIP coupled with Exede would be eliminated or at least reduced. From what I understand, Exede's upload speed is less than the download speed (or is it the other way around? - apologies, I'm a computer moron), thus the latency which in my case is an echo of my voice when using magicJack. So with new satellite no improvement with upload or download, huh? No hope at all?
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Rae Yearnd

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If the overall network speed is improved then the performance of any VoIP device will be improved too.  Even with Exede Voice or Vonage some calls are so bad that all you can do is hang up and call back.  Of course that happens with cell calls too.
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Michael Wood

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Great - a ray of hope. I'll have to wait until this fall to see (hear, actually) if there's an improvement, but I'm now a bit more optimistic. Thanks.
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xode0000, Champion

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[ quote author = Michael Wood ]

Thanks for the replies, but I guess this means VOIP (magicJack) performance will not be improved with new satellite...

[ /quote ]

The latency of an internet connection is the time it takes for a signal to go from your computer, or VOIP equipment, to a server on the internet and then from that server back to your computer.  With a satellite connection, to do so, the signal has to travel 22350 miles out to the satellite and back again, twice.  Given the speed of light in a vacuum, that signal takes about half a second to make those trips.  There is no way around that and more satellites will not shorten that time.  What more satellites will do is increase the amount of data that can make that trip at the same time.

However, not all VOIP systems are created equal.  Half a second latency is workable.  I have had no problems with any of the websites I have used and some of those have included online chat.  If that can work, so can VOIP.  It is just a matter of getting VOIP equipment that is made to work.  Magic Jack is quite sloppy when it comes to VOIP.  Exede has VOIP that will likely work much better for you.
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Michael Wood

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I started using magicJack when I had cable internet at a previous residence, and it worked flawlessly. I then moved to an area where satellite internet was the only option, and MJ has worked perfectly for months - no echo, crystal clear on both ends - but then I would begin to experience problems. Echo, static, etc. Beats me as to why this is. I'm just hoping ViaSat 2 will improve performance. I will say that magicJack is dirt cheap and a great value when working correctly with satellite ISP.
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Nicholas Wilson

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[quote]

For the first time, the company pinned down a launch date for its 300-gigabit per second ViaSat-2 satellite.

It will be shipped next month from Boeing’s Satellite Systems International facility in El Segundo to the Arianespace launch site in French Guiana. Once it launches, it will take a few months to position ViaSat-2 in orbit. The satellite is expected to begin delivering Internet service to customers in the fourth quarter of 2017.

[end quote]
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Deku, Champion

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*o* THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! :3 also i CANT wait :3
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gokartergo24

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Is it true that it'll be at orbital slot 69.9?  If so, That's is not going to help people in Calif very much with a elevation of around 15 degrees. That won't even point over most peoples roofs.
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xode0000, Champion

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However, it will help take the eastern U.S. load off of ViaSat1 and thereby free up more of ViaSat1 for California.
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Alex Mh

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Michael, new satellites and new ground equipment can sometimes shorten the delay, never completely eliminate. 45,000 miles distance from Earth to satellite and back to Earth can not be elininated. Signal travels at the speed of light 180,000 miles PER SECOND but it still takes 0.2s to cover this distance. Plus, delays in ground station computers.
(Edited)
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Hfcomms

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Some interesting numbers in the article, especially for people that think that Exede is ripping them off.

/snip

Revenue came in at $381 million, up from $348 million for the same quarter last year. Net income dipped, however, to $4.2 million from $9.7 million a year earlier – in part because of a $34 million increase in research and development costs for work on upcoming satellite projects.

/snip

Satellite Internet is horrendously expensive and for a large company like Viasat only having a net income of 4.2 million dollars should tell you something about how expensive it is.  That wouldn't even buy one of Trump's fancy airplanes.

I know that Hughesnet residential internet division was running at a loss for the first 10 years and they depended on their enterprise and military contracts to carry the residential and I have the idea that the Exede division is probably operating at a net loss as well.  Having any satellite Internet at all for less than $200 a month is a great deal.  Your local cable or Wireless Internet provider has very little infrastructure expense compared to satellite based.

The expenses to build huge satellites and then to send them on a rocket to geosynchronous orbit over 20,000 miles away and then not to mention the giant uplink/downlink dishes and equipment at the network operations centers, ect really can't compare to the expenses in providing terrestrial internet service.  Food for thought for people that think Exede is ripping you off and getting rich off of you.
(Edited)
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Dan White

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Seems like it would be cheaper for them to lay glass cable to us last resort for ISP type people out here in the hinderlands.
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Steve Frederick, Champion

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Laying fiber is not cheap, it runs between $10,000 an $20,000 per mile, depending on the terrain. Unless each mile has over 25 homes per mile, there is no way it will ever become profitable to an ISP.
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Rae Yearnd

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Next generation cell coverage should be a interesting player in this game also. Most Satellites have a 10 to 15 year life span but that may be the estimate for the old Ku model of demod and remod where transmitters and receivers have a limited lifespan.  The Viasat technology is a little different and so the birds may have a longer projected life span.  I wonder what kind of service life is customary for fiber and the switching equipment necessary for that system.  Also part of the Viasat system are the various ground stations that have to be built up, manned and maintained too.
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Jim16, Champion

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Well said.  The company is spending a LOT for their customers.  " With ViaSat-2 set to launch, the company has already begun work on ViaSat-3, a group of three satellites that will provide global coverage. Each satellite will have 1 terabit per second capacity -- more than three times the bandwidth of ViaSat-2.  The first of these satellites is expected to launch over North America in 2019.   ViaSat-2 will allow the company to offer Internet plans with 50 to 100 megabits per second speeds."  !!!!
(Edited)
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brella

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They need to spend some money. This is what my speeds look like for about 5-6 hours every evening. Tier 2 tech told me I should expect speeds of around 1 mbps every night. Maybe the new satellite will take care of them overselling.

(Edited)
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Keith Dickinson

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Not convinced that satellite internet is viable beyond 3 years. With the explosive debut of 5G cell networks set for 2018/2019, there will be a near total "coast to coast" coverage for land users.
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Tony

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No cell phone signals at my house yet...
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Markgc, Champion

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Yes but what will the data limits be on the new 5G service ?  There are some pretty severe data limits on the current 4G service. It really isn't being marketed as a solution for home based internet users..
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Keith Dickinson

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Carriers are claiming that they will be able to offer unlimited data plans. This is because the RF spectrum to be used is so wide that data congestion will no longer be an issue. This was the whole logic behind AT&T's acquisition of DirecTV. ATT wanted to have the customer base in place so that when 5G is realized, they will be able to hit the ground running in competition with the cable/internet companies. If you notice, the "forward thinking" carriers are already providing unlimited video/music streaming on their networks. ATT provides unlimted access to DirecTV apps so you can watch any of your programming on any device, anywhere in the US. Exciting times ahead.
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Christine Conrad, Champion

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In many areas of the country, where hills and mountains dominate the geography, cell service is still limited and unreliable. Flatlanders may have good service from cell  providers, but the majority of us live in areas void of cell service or ground based internet.
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Keith Dickinson

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That is true for 4G and this is the beauty of 5G. Not only are speeds unbelievable, coverage areas are over 4 times as large. The early testing shows that full coverage, even in the most rural areas, will be achievable. We're talking about gbps speeds in urban areas and at least 10's of mbps in rural/mountainous regions.
(Edited)
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Rae Yearnd

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that is all good news because unlike in healthcare  competition and choice will guide the market.  Neither ViaSat nor the Terrestrial providers will be able to take advantage of a captive market.