Switching to Linux?

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Is switching to Linux worth the hassle? What is involved to do this?
Is Linux really better than Windows?
Thanks.
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John Postizzi

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Posted 2 months ago

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Harvey Mueller

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10 years ago I used spare parts to build a Linux box. Times have changed but from that venture, I found

1. Very few printers have linux drivers available. HP printers have good linux support but not all other printer manufacturers do.

2. Not all ethernet cards have linux support.

3. Not all monitors are auto detected so you may need to hand enter resolution, refresh rate etc to get it to fit on your screen.

The above are the big gotcha's but linux is stable with minimal number of pop ups. Things aren't as automated or polished as Windows but you'll have more control. If you choose to explore it further, a second machine would be recommended. Optionally add another hard drive and dual boot your current system to Windows or linux.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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That's funny. I use Tails at times, a variant of linux, and I have found it to worth well with any machine I boot it from for the monitor and ethernet to work. Not sure about printing though.
(Edited)
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Ronald Stricklin

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Installing the most popular linux distro's is no more complicated than installing windows. It's a straight forward automated step by step process. I wouldn't recommend you jump right into some thing like arch linux. Something ununtu based would be the simplest starting point. Try out a live usb. Go download http://rufus.akeo.ie/ rufus and then a linux distro that you'd like to try, since your new I'd say linux mint https://linuxmint.com/ and run the live usb. Try it before you install it and see if you can jive with in. There's going an app store with most of the common types of apps you'll need all free. Steam has plenty of linux compatible games and their proton support is adding windows compatibility. Lutris has a variant of wine and is set up to easily install many windows games. There's wine with plenty of apps that simplify the installation. Then there are paid products like crossover that make it easier to install windows compatible software.

Vertransatuser is secretly a spy.
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Michael McDowell

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Spying for who on what? 
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Ronald Stricklin

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Tails is a security oriented variety of linux. Snowden used it. i was making a joke.
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Ronald Stricklin

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Actually now that my memory comes back to me I'd say avoid linux mint. Elementary os is probably now the easiest to use and its secure.
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Harvey Mueller

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Well as I said it's been a few years and it get's better all the time.  I never did find drivers for a Compaq printer so no print capability and purchased new network card. 

Yes to what Ronald said above.  Live usb would be a good start.  The distro I liked at the time was SuSE linux.  Use the link below to get free download of Live or installable version.  The Live version burns to a DVD or usb stick and runs completely from the DVD or usb - nothing written to hard disk.  You'll also notice there is a KDE version and Gnome.  Those are just 2 different graphical interfaces, themes as you will for the screen layout.  


https://software.opensuse.org/distributions/leap

YMMV  - your mileage may vary
Good luck
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Ronald Stricklin

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It was alot worse. Talking about a nightmare way back when redhat still had an official desktop version. More or less if a PC was made in the last 10 years it should work and well the newer the better as it were. Opensuse is quite stable but I'm not sure its really the best shot at entry level.

Older broadcom chip have some notorious issues (those needing the opensource b43 firmware as I recall).
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David S.

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A few years ago I got fed up with having to call Microsoft on the telephone every time I wanted to do a fresh install of Windows 7, online activation always failed and gave me a phone number to call instead. 

I ended up using Ubuntu for a couple years, It was a nice looking desktop with unity and pretty much everything I needed worked for me. All the online games that I had played in windows worked just as good for me in Linux using Chrome.

Like Ronald's saying though download a version then burn it to dvd or install it on a usb stick with Rufus or Unetbootin. I don't know about Rufus but Unetbootin can download a distribution  from a built in list then make a bootable usb for you. Then you can boot from it and try it out without making any changes to your computer.

From what I hear Linux Mint or Ubuntu would be the easiest ones to switch over from Windows. You could also have a dual boot with Linux and Windows but it's a little more complicated partitioning your hard drive. 

Check out https://www.dedoimedo.com/linux.html he has a lot of tutorials on installing linux.


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David S.

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And yes I think it's worth it and security wise I think its better than windows.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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What other OS isn't more secure than Windows. Lol
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Chad Simpson

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I run Linux Mint on a desktop and 4 laptops.  I had some minor issues with an update once but other than that it's run great.  We have an Epson and HP printer and have installed drivers for both.  I haven't been able to get the scanner driver working yet for the Epson but it's a minor detail. 
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Hfcomms

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I don't run any microsoft products anymore.  I have an Apple iMac for the desktop, an iPad and run Linux on my notebook.  Linux has many different flavors from easy to hard depending on your computer knowledge.  If your a basic Windows point and click type user Ubuntu or Kubuntu are good distro's to start with and as has been suggested before you can download a live CD and burn it to a disc or USB drive and kind of try it out first to see if you like it.  The more popular versions are supported pretty good with drivers for various hardware, printers, wifi, ect.  Overall it takes less system resources, less things to go wrong and it doesn't 'phone home' to microsoft all the time like the Window's operating systems do.
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GabeU, Champion

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My opinion is that various Linux disros are fairly good.  I'm partial to Linux Mint, but Ubuntu is a good one, as well.  Whether Linux is better or worse than Windows really depends on what you plan to use it for.  If just general browsing, email, shopping, paying bills, Youtube, etc, Linux is just fine, in my opinion.  If doing something more specific, it depends on what Linux based programs/apps are available for the particular thing you're trying to do.

Linux does take some getting used to, and learning how to use it properly does take a little while.  Once you get used to it, though, it's a great OS.  

If you have a spare HDD you can always try it on that to see how you like it.  There are also ways of putting various Linux distros onto a USB flash drive so you can take a test drive, so to speak.  Ubuntu is a great one for this, and they have instructions on their website for doing so.
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barg_

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About 12 years ago I ~mostly switched to Linux.  Started with Gentoo, found that to work but didn't see any noticeable benefit to the extra work needed to install and maintain it.  Then Mandrake, then PCLinuxos, then mostly Kubuntu (most of the years since).  Plus a few others in between.  Many distributions are based on Ubuntu, including Mint.  For typical home use, and satellite Internet, I'd suggest Mint.  Being Ubuntu based, it's about as user friendly as it gets and among the most popular for beginners.  Things like proprietary graphics drivers are included if needed, at least easily available, they take some work on some other distributions (not that they will work perfectly in all cases).  Also, Mint is based on the LTS (long term) release, so you mostly get security updates, major updates with large downloads don't come as often.  I've always had Canon printers, haven't had issues.  HP support is ok, possibly better.  If trying Ubuntu itself, it's best to look at the latest LTS release so you're not doing a major upgrade as often (if you don't want to).

Other distributions are fine.  openSUSE is very good, I just wouldn't suggest it as much for a beginner.  But if trying that, maybe start with Gecko, it has more stuff set up out of the box https://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=gecko .  I also like Arch based stuff.

You can also install Android, I have it on a 11.6" 2 in 1, works fine.

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sopiabrown

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Generally, most of the users prefer to access a Windows OS based system yet there are several users who have an access to these Linux based systems. At the first time, the new users get trouble in such a switching process. The suggestion provided by Apple customer support number must be utilized by them to solve out all those issues smoothly.
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GabeU, Champion

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How do you look something like that up?  Obviously one doesn't want to actually go to the site to find out the hard way.  
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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whois on applesupportnumber.net yields:

http://whois.domaintools.com/applesupportnumber.net


domaintools.com doesn't show the registered domain owner (but does show the IP address owner).

Frequently, they'll use a domain registration by proxy to hide the domain registration info or simply pay extra so that it's unpublished. However, a ping on applesupportnumber.net yields 77.73.70.10.

whois on ip address yields:

http://whois.domaintools.com/77.73.70.10

which tells the owner of the ip addresses in a range and who hosts the domain (different than domain registration). Tougher to hide behind the IP address.


For example, this domain, community.viasat.com is registered to Viasat; however the IP address where it's hosted is actually Amazon. 

The free whois at domain tools just provides the basics, there's much more they offer but you get what you pay for ;)  
(Edited)
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M.E.M.

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My Malwarebytes caught this.
The log says

"Malwarebyteswww.malwarebytes.com

-Blocked Website Details-
Malicious Website: 1
, , Blocked, [-1], [-1],0.0.0

-Website Data-
Category: Phishing
Domain: applesupportnumber.net
IP Address: 77.73.70.10
Port: [52114]
Type: Outbound
File: C:\Program Files (x86)\ViaSat\Viasat Browser\Application\Viasat Browser.exe"

Steve identified the threat so I hovered over the link. It is there that Malwarebytes told me that the site was in Russia and that it was designed for identity theft. Malwarebytes prohibited me from following the link.

Malwarebytes cost me about $29 per year and is updated daily with any new threats.
Not having my identity stolen is priceless.



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GabeU, Champion

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I tried whois, but I must have entered it wrong as I didn't get that info.  I did find info at hphost, though, but I didn't know if it was showing what you guys were seeing.  Taking a closer look it does show that it's suspicious.



Unfortunately, I only have the free version of Malwarebytes, so only the on demand scanning.  
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Ronald Stricklin

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Why would apple help you switch to linux? If they wanted to push you to a free OS it would seem they would push you to darwin.
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David S.

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Doing a VirusTotal url scan only 2 scanners detect it out of 67. 

DNS8................Malicious

Kaspersky.........Phishing

Good catch Steve Frederick!

(Edited)
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Chad Simpson

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Nothing says scammer like improper english.
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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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Alester How post is just another spam message that is trying to gather your personal information. Do not click on the link given.

Moderators, please ban this poster and remove the post.