Only getting west coast local channels on Sling and CBS All Access. But I live in Minnesota.

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I am unable to get local channels on my Sling or CBS All Access now that I have Viasat. I only get west coast channels, I am in Minnesota. I checked with Sling and CBS All Access and they said it is because of Viasat is a satellite and Viasat would have to change that. What do I do? I can't find anything on the website about it.
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Casey T-dens

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Posted 1 year ago

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Brad, Viasat Employee

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Hi Casey

Unfortunately that's an issue that you'll have to contact Sling customer support over. We only provide internet service. My guess is somehow your IP address is associating you with being on the west coast somehow but we can't change your IP since it's a dynamic IP address which means it changes several times. Short term solution you may have to bring out an antenna until it gets sorted out as a work around if you want to watch your local news.
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Roy Munson

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I use Viasat for internet only. For video I have Dish. It's cheaper than direct but not always fool proof. Dish provides local channels and provides HD also. Good Luck!
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Could she upgrade to a business account and get a static IP address that is in her area?
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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we do offer persistent IP addresses on our Business plans. While I cut the cord myself about a year ago I don't subscribe to Sling, Vue, or DirecTVNOW to know how the local channel set ups go. I do utilize an antenna for that and that's a simple input change or you can do some work around with Plexus (incidentally something I was looking into this morning to do). There's also a local news app that can be put on streaming devices but the catch is that not all markets are on it. 
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Casey T-dens

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Is it easy to change to a business plan? The company I work for pays for my service anyway.
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Dances With Woofs

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A better question might be for Sling and CBS All Access...

Why do they rely on notoriously inaccurate IP-based geolocation services rather than your billing address or your account registration? Note the answer has something to do with mobile devices and where you happen to be at the moment ;)

IP Addresses say nothing about your physical location; they do provide the ability to determine  the ISP they are registered to (in our case Viasat with a HQ in CA).  IP-based geolocation services are guesses - some are better than others and become quickly outdated as IP addresses are reassigned. Even with a persistent or static IP address assigned it would take some time for the geolocation databases to eventually reflect your physical location.

Devices having GPS features can be used to determine location with accuracy provided you share your location info.

Some browsers also have extensions that allow you to specify you own location and share that info with sites requesting it (only applicable to browser applications).    

   
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Casey T-dens

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Yes I went backhand forth with them for 2 days over this. They passed the ball to Viasat. At one point I got Wichita stations on CBS All Access but that was as close to Minnesota as they could get. 
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Tammy

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It may have something to do with the streaming device you are using.  I subscribe to DirectTV Now and pick up local channels with AppleTV, but not able to pick them up with Roku device.  Make sure you have set your zip code on your streaming device.  I do have the zip code in the Roku, but it still does not work.  
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Alice Perryman

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I have this same problem. I have talked to them too. Amazon and CBS all access say it is Viasat's problem and I think it is because of the IP thing. I changed to Viasat and this problem started. Sometimes I'm told I don't have permission to view certain local stations due to my geography and then I go out to my other TV and it gives me a channel for Austin which isn't particularly local. It's driving me nuts

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Brad, Viasat Employee

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It's probably our gateways more than anything. Some streaming devices may allow for a manual zip entry but others I've seen do a workaround on with a VPN (which are hit and miss for our service) but chances are that you are on our DFW core node and that's affecting it. Have you tried clearing the cache? I know some devices have that (ie firetv it's in the settings) that *might* help.
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ExSatUser

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It is not because of the IP address. It has to do with where the Gateway is located. Maybe a VPN will work, maybe not. Viasat is not intended for cord cutting, so watching local channels that depend on location to determine which network affliate you receive is not recommended In the first place.
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Dances with Woofs

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No it's because they typically utilize IP-based geolocation providers which are notoriously inaccurate unless coupled with devices having GPS. Typically these will resolve to your core node location over time but really depends on what geolocation provider the service provider is using as well as what techniques is being used - IP geolocation vs W3C Geolocation API vs geocoding:

https://www.geolocation.com/

There's only one reliable piece of info that can be obtained from IP address - the owner of the range in which the IP address falls - it says nothing about about location although some content providers misuse it for that purpose. The W3C API and geocoding approaches can be easily defeated by the user and are avoided by content providers who charge and must limit local broadcasts to their areas. Some VPNs will allow you a static IP (usually an extra charge) which will eventually better reflect your location but even then the major players will block VPN at some point.

Land based providers tend to assign ip address ranges by locality and content providers incorrectly assume that to be a standard - but it's not a requirement and Viasat really doesn't have that option. Some developer undoubtedly said hey it's accurate for my ip and location, so it must be true for the rest of the world.      
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