Mystery Solved

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  • Problem
  • Updated 5 months ago
  • Acknowledged
I am grandfathered in on Unlimited Silver 25. Of course my speeds have been throttled for several months based on the “the new policy”. However, recently they’ve become even worse at all hours. We have never used more than 40 gs of the 150, so I attributed it to congestion because school is out. Imagine my surprise when I looked at new plans offered on my beam and found that my current plan Unlimited Silver 25 is being offered again at $50 more per month. No wonder I’m being severely slowed. They want me gone. So disappointed.
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Rose Smith

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Posted 5 months ago

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ExSatUser

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They dont want you gone. They want you to change plans to pay more for less.
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Rose Smith

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I would have to pay more for the EXACT same plan which, I assume, will give me the same slow speeds. There is an option for 50gs that would cost less, but I have no reason to think it would give me speeds above 2mbp since that is what I now get, if not slower.
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J&J

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There's more to what ViaSat is doing in their "network management" than meets the eye at first glance.  A typical customer is a bandwidth liability, that is, they will possibly consume the total quantity of data associated with their plan.  ViaSat was flying blind for years, not able to calculate the total demand possible on their system and that left severe uncertainties of available capability, especially during peak usage times. The present policy allows ViaSat to calculate and cap the total demand, at least over-all on a monthly basis so network availability is known and therefore controllable.  

The Freedom 150 plans came along about the time HughesNet launched the Jupiter-2 satellite and subsequently gave Hughes tremendous availability.  ViaSat was not to be up-staged so they offered the Freedom and some unlimited plans in a showing of bandwidth capability, offering large data plans they could ill-afford in terms of bandwidth availability. ViaSat sort-of gave a blank check to customers in what they could do with their data usage and no longer could predict total system demand.  

Enter government incentives to service rural America.  If ViaSat was going to receive millions of dollars for servicing the boondocks of America (in addition to subscriber monthly payments), they had to have available bandwidth to do it.  Where's all that new bandwidth going to come from?  A method of capping a subscribers usage had to be put into place.  Terminate the largest plans, cap the un-limited, stop the ability to purchase more data during the month, and thereby know what to expect in a worst-case scenario.  When customers can't purchase more data, the expected demand is easily calculable and many, many, new customers can be added because the network liability can be determined and controlled.

The network capability is a bit like real estate that can be sub-divided.  A Freedom plan can be split into a worse-case of 3 or more subscribers, similarly, an un-limited plan also can be  split-off into several more subs, all with a maximum network liability that cannot be exceeded due to no more data being able to be purchased during a given month.  There are still plans that have the ability to purchase more data during the month but don't expect them to be around much longer.



(Edited)
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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If you like your Viasat internet plan, you can keep it but we are going to make it suck.
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Whitey

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Wow that is the most negative comment I ever heard you say about Viasat. Welcome to the club.
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ExSatUser

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No. He turned awhile ago.
Give him credit. Stephen's sixth cajun sense told him not to be a shill for this company.
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ExSatUser

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As I explained several times, Viasat gave away too much priority data to begin with. Subsequently, the company in its infinite wisdom decided to start deprioritize subs with 150GB anytime, regardless of data used. This alienated a group of customers and some dealers. The answer? Switch plans or quit if you want better speeds back. A number of posters on here opted to quit. Others changed plans and said speeds got better.

You have to make the choice. Keep your plan, switch and pay more, or cancel.
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Rose Smith

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I made my decision to keep my plan several months ago. I’m just surprised that they, again, offered the “”unlimited” plan. That seems counterintuitive making the data more equitable to all customers as Viasat explained. Just saying. It is what it is.
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ExSatUser

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I expect you will continue to get slower and slower. Viasat doesn't want you on that plan. They want you to pay more for less!!!
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Will Seemore

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"More for less", that seems to be the business model of businesses that feel they have a captive audience will little competition. They just keep raising prices while cutting costs and providing poorer service, until they find the tipping point where they take things too far and profits start decreasing. Ebay is another one, they have pretty much tripled the fees they charge which with the way they are structured would keep up with inflation without being raised. At the same time they have outsourced customer service to 3rd world country call centers that provide terrible service and many times don't have a clue what your needs are.
(Edited)
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Brian Smith

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Actually, "more for less" is the very underpinnings of a capitalist economy.  Businesses will always push the market as far as it will bear.  Not to do so would be foolish in a competitive marketplace.