Mesh WiFi?

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I am thinking about replacing my router/extender setup with a mesh system. The Exede hardware, which doesn’t cover the whole house, is in bridge mode. They all say to place the router in the middle of the house. The router has to be at one end of a 4000sqft rectangle with the Exede modem. Would a mesh system be better than router/extender? If a mesh system isn’t the way to go, then what should I go with? My existing router/extender is 5-7 years old and I can’t upgrade the firmware.
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David Kingman

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Posted 1 week ago

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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Sounds pretty good to me, especially with a large home.

https://amp.tomsguide.com/us/what-is-...
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johnny c

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One of my students replaced his router with a Mesh system, he was very satisfied.  He was not a Viasat customer.
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Bob Lexus

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I know someone with an Orbi mesh for their large house with a close by guest house.
A little spendy but they love it
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Oliver

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ubiquiti mesh gear gets my vote. I've installed a good 40 of them now. Some see 25+ active clients at a time.
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Joshua

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I just installed two Synology MR2200AC units and am very happy with them thus far. An important feature for me was that these are one of the first to support the new WPA3 security standard. They also have built in VPN server support as well which I was excited about.

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wm4bama, Champion

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I've not tried it but you can setup your system with devices that transmits your router or modem output through your existing power lines...About $50.00 will get you started with one device that sends the signal and one device that receives...you can add additional receivers as needed.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/interior-projects/how-to/a14101/how-to-transmit-internet-power...

Power line networking basically turns a building's existing electrical wiring -- the wires that carry electricity to different outlets in the house -- into network cables, meaning they also carry data signals for a computer network. And this means virtually all households, in the U.S at least, are "wired for" power line networking. It doesn't replace a regular network, so you'll still need a router, but it's a good way to extend your existing network into new places.

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/home-networking-part-7-power-line-connections-explained/

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Oliver

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avoid power line networking. Most use no security at all. everything is sent in the clear on the power line. If you have your own transformer nothing will get passed that. But if your got say 10-20 house near you all on one transformer any of those houses can plug in and look at your data.
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wm4bama, Champion

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Most satellite internet customers live in remote areas where connecting multiple houses to one transformer is not feasible,  Even if it occurred the signal will have the same security as the wifi from the router, nothing is sent "in the clear"...anyone piggy-backing from the same transformer would need to know the network's password of the router and also know what device is being used to feed the signal onto the power lines and purchase the same receiver device to plug into their power line outlet..and the distance involved in piggy-backing would make it very unlikely that the data signal would be strong enough to be used even with the correct power line receiver..

So the likelihood of that happening is about the same as someone driving and parking next to your house and stealing the wifi signal from your router..and the same password to your network/router would have to be known by the piggy-backer..
 
(Edited)
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Makes sense.
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David Kingman

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Power line networking is not mesh networking https://www.amazon.com/AmpliFi-Ubiqui...

Power line networking is kind of outdated unless it has wireless component.

I was able to get my Netgear 6220 working and updateable by resetting to factory defaults after putting the Exede router in bridge mode.. So I don’t feel the urgency to replace it.
(Edited)
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wm4bama, Champion

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David, I think everyone recognizes the differences between the two systems.

I posted an alternate method to a Mesh solution for two main reasons:

1.  Cost--- a Mesh installation is about 10x the cost of the wired installation and

2.  Intended use (what is needed by the user).  Example:  My Uncle has a large dairy farm and needed an internet connection in the barn where his cows are fed and milked...the wired system works perfectly for him...the barn is about 150 yards from his house.

Cost and intended use can be evaluated by user's and the appropriate method chosen..