Internet in rural Pennsylvania

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This person is obviously not a fan of satellite internet.

If they think it is bad in PA, they should see how bad it is in parts of Ohio and Virginia.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.thei...
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ExSatUser

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Posted 4 days ago

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Will Seemore

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How long will this thread last before the powers to be vaporize it? A lot of threads getting killed off lately.
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GabeU, Champion

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For the record he has officially been around for 11 days, I guess he is the alter ego of a Viasat homer from days gone by.
More like a realist who knows his stuff and who has been a part of this Community for quite some time.  
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ExSatUser

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Gabe and the double post!
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GabeU, Champion

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It's a curse!  LOL.  When it will strike, no one knows, but it's always lurking, ready to rear its ugly double head.  :)  
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ExSatUser

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Always happens to you though! 
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GabeU, Champion

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I might have gremlins hiding in my network.  

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johnny c

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It is unfortunate that satellite internet qualifies for the government subsidized broadband program and will likely label those communities as now "served by broadband".  This is a true travesty of the intended purpose of the program.

This should serve as a "heads up" to those individuals in areas that have no broadband or only have a satellite internet option.  Contact your elected representatives and insure they are aware of this so that they lobby for FIOS or cable with 50, 100 Mbps up to 1 Gbps service, at any time of the day, without data caps at a reasonable cost and do not accept any other technology that can not deliver that performance. Today those numbers are very reasonable and what is needed to perform the myriad of operations that residential customers, small businesses, and schools require and should expect.

I don't know what the government standards are for an ISP to qualify for federal funds but if satellite internet qualifies than it should be reported to a government agency concerned with Waste, Fraud, and Abuse.

My area was served by satellite, but the inability of satellite technology to provide the broad band service that is required to provide the community with reliable service, reasonable speeds and a affordable cost structure allowed the forward thinking government officials to apply and secure funding for FIOS.

Having been a Wildblue, Exede, Viasat customer for 7 years and now a rural FIOS customer for 6 weeks, I can tell you it is like Night and Day, and my hope is that this service can be extended to all internet users.

Don't just get on this forum and P**s and Moan, Contact your legislators, insure they are aware of what is really needed less you go down the path of rural Pennsylvania.


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ExSatUser

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My post was to generate discussion. I know Viasat and Hughesnet want to get in on the government funding of rural internet. Other providers are fighting against them, arguing satellite internet can't meet the internet needs of people in 2020.

As noted in the article, low data caps and high latency are two big drawbacks. Even if they can meet the speed threshold of 25Mbps.

Data caps is another big problem. While they advertise it as "unlimited" data, we all know that once priority data is used, all bets are off.

The digital divide only continues to get worse. I am not optimistic anything is going to change soon.
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GabeU, Champion

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They did it in my corner of NY state with HN.  It's still the same HN, but the available plans are larger than normal and the price is better.  Plus, no lease fees.  It would cost me $25 less per month and I'd have 30GB more data, overall.  

I'd take advantage of it, but I'd have to cancel what I have now, then wait for 45 days after my service termination to sign back up.  I think I'd go batty without internet for that long.  Then again, I could go with a prepaid cell phone with a couple of months of unlimited service.  One that can tether, of course.  And I know that, when it comes to tethering, the "unlimited" service has an even larger asterisk, but it would probably be enough for me to get by for that time.  If I finally decide to change to one of the NY sponsored plans, that's probably what I'll do.  
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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On the unlimited plans all bets are off whether or not you have used your priority data.