Your router is under constant XMAS attack. They should NOT be making it through to my router. What to do?

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  • Question
  • Updated 2 weeks ago
  • Acknowledged
Since 1510 pacific time over 100 pages of XMAS port attacks. Each page has 10 entries. These should be blocked before they hit up link feed.
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Martin Seebach

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  • aggravated

Posted 2 weeks ago

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TheJanitor

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Viasat has "real" internet where very few ports are blocked and "incoming" is permitted.

YOU need to check your router and verify it's firewall is "on" and you have no ports forwarded.
If you are not using a router, then your Operating System firewall needs to be checked.
You should be able to make Operating System firewall entries (or rules) to block the attack. This is very important if the attacks are coming in port 80 (broadcast port).
You also should be using anti-virus that will also stop the attack.

If the bad-guy attacks don't see a place to go and be received, they won't be sent if they are always rejected.  Blocked by firewall stops them from using up your data because the "ack" won't be sent back to them to make the trip successful (and your system won't be asking for more).

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Oliver

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Huhu "real" internet. It's all proxyed to us, your public IP seems to live at viasat gateways. At worst it will cause the proxy / web accelerator to crash. Viasats provlem. I always reject and not block I like them to know when I reject.
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TheJanitor

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Oliver,  Have you ever had the problem of your data seeming to "just disappear" for no apparent reason?


I'm trying to solve a problem in it's entirety.  #1: Stop the attacks, #2: Stop the attacker from wasting your data that the attack is consuming.
You can let your computer reject packets day and night until your monthly data quota has been expended and still never have had met your attacker which is most likely a Bot anyway.  If you tell that attacker that you are indeed home but quite safe from him, that digital conversation used your data and invites the attack to continue.  The Bot after all is looking for a challenge and finally, conquest.


The attacks stop when the Bot does not sense a potential victim and it goes and looks elsewhere. Someday, another Bot will appear and it will leave too.


Spending your data teasing a Bot just doesn't seem to be a productive use of your metered data.
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Oliver

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I have not had anyone use up my data with an outside attack to my modem no. But I can see how it could be done and cause the use of data. If someone is targeted you that hard, call support and ask for a new dhcp lease. find out how your being targeted. dont click dumb links.
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