Delay when speaking on phone

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THERE IS A TWO OR THREE SECOND DELAY WHEN YOU SPEAK AND WHEN IT IS HEARD ON OTHER EN, MAKING IT VERY DIFFICULT FOR A CONVERSATION.
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RICK ROPPEL

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Posted 3 years ago

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RICK ROPPEL

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WHY DOESN"T THE HELP CENTER AWNSER THE QUESTION RATHER THAN PUT IT UP FOR DISCUSSION, AFTER ALL THIS SERVICE IS NOT FREE!
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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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The delay is caused by the physics of radio signal speed. The signal must travel from your dish to the satellite located 22,500 miles from your home, then back to the earth station, negotiate the internet, then back to the satellite and then back down to your dish.  That makes for a 90,000 mile trip, which takes about 700 milliseconds. With satellite internet, this delay cannot be reduced until they can figure out a way to have thousands of low orbit satellites closer to the earth.
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Alex Mh

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Right conclusion, wrong specifics. Signal travels from the phone to satellite and bounces back to Earth station. Total 45,000 miles in space or 0.2 seconds delay.  The rest is travel time between the Earth stations and all the required signal processing. When this is a connection between 2 satellite phones located really far away from each other, then it might have to travel in space more than 45,000 miles.
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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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Alex Mh, Your analogy describes what a one way conversation would do. I rather enjoy two way conversations when I use my phone.
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Alex Mh

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Question in post #1 was about delay between "when you speak and when it's heard on the other end".

Latency definition, as per Viasat: "the length of time that it takes our signal to travel from your home to our satellite, and then down to a ground-based gateway which connects you to the internet".

In two-way conversation there is latency one way to send a message, and then another way to hear the answer, but this is another story. Let's not get confused.
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Jim16

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Steve just replied to his post of 2 years ago and I heard no delay!  Fascinating... 
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Jess Tolbirt

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we use majic jack and there is no noticeable delay..
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corey ellis

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Mr. Steve Frederick, is correct. I couldn't have explained it better myself!
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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Hi Rick,  Steve is correct. Because it is on a satellite internet service, there is a small delay. Usually after a few minutes on the call the delay shortens or goes away. The maximum latency is 600 ms for successful voice call but it is preferable to keep it to 200 ms. Higher jitter has as a  much greater impact on the call quality than latency. If you have any additional questions please send an email ot exedelistens@viasat.com
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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When things are working properly, the delay isn't noticeable.  Yes, the laws of physics cause there to be a delay, but in reality you won't even notice it.  

I remember back in the good old days of dialup when lots of people had two phone lines.  One phone line was for internet and the other was for voice.

This is before everyone had cell phones.  Me and my friends would sometimes call each other inside of the same house, just for the novelty of talking on the phone and looking at each other at the same time.  To our surprise, there was a delay of at least one second before our voice would come out of the other phone.  This was with a local call!  So even with land based telephones, there has always been latency.  

There are a lot of things that can make a VOIP call go wrong, and its more than just latency.  Last month my Sprint phone worked perfect when doing wifi calls over Viasat.  I tried to make a call a few days ago and it was so bad I had to hang up, disconnect from wifi and do cellular.  I was making the call during the day and had speeds over 5 mbps so I doubt the issue was Viasat, although that is a possibility.

That's the end of my rant.  I'm  just saying latency isn't as big a deal as you would think for VOIP calls.  Even regular cellular calls act up and have echos from time to time.
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Jim16

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That is so true.  I have had cell phones that had a very big delay, so many factors come into play.