what technique is used to throttle Viasat2??

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what technique is used to throttle
Viasat2??


ok so yes I'm over my data limit so yes web pages load slower I get that. Tech support made that quite clear but what I could not get them to understand is that my ping loss to google.com is 79%. is viasat2 throttling by dropping packets??? I don't care about speed I do care about dropping 3/4 of my packets.

Any one know what technique is used to throttle??


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clizity

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Posted 6 months ago

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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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What is your issue? You stated you have gone over your priority data limit, so yes, you should expect to be throttled. Depending on the plan you are on, you might actually be experiencing the deprioritizing, which puts other data flow above yours for customers who are still within their data limits.
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mike barber

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I think his issue was clearly stated. He would like to get some technical information and it seems to me he understands throttling and priority data. I don't see the need to explain it to him. This happens all the time, you ask which way the blue bus is going and the answer you get is that blue is the most popular color for buses.
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Jim16

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I think Yellow is the most popular, right?
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mike barber

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Exactly.
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SamsMusicStorage 1

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Throttling by dropping packets shows that they have oversold their bandwidth. This is a red flag for a classic ISP scam where they don't have the backend bandwidth to support the customers that they are supposedly servicing. They oversell, then use a load balancer to attempt to manage the traffic. The thing is, the IT at Viasat are ham-handed and horrible at it, so their techniques are blatantly obvious to anyone with a modicum of server experience. My connection goes through ten hops of 1000ms a piece before hitting a backbone. That's ten hops bouncing around viasat's horrible system before I even get to google. Each hop long enough for travel from the east coast to the west coast and back. This is all to get 30 miles to the data center. Absolute garbage. On top of that, reducing packets drops connection, which is their intent. It drops every other minute by my tracking. I am assembling all of this, and then I plan to sue them. I don't mind using small claims court. I'll track the whole case live online through multiple outlets and my journalist friend is going to submit it to the major publication they work for, as well as getting an independent IT investigator to replicate my results. I'll point you all to the proper information when I post. Screw Viasat!
(Edited)
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SamsMusicStorage 1

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Steve, you are either complicit or you do not understand IT. When someone pays for 10/100, that is a dedicated line. "congestion" on lines is a myth perpetuated by IT companies. While there can be route issues through Level3 or whoever owns the lines, what Viasat is doing is overselling their capacity and using contracts to try to normalize it. It doesn't make it right, cool, or proper business practice. Stop apologizing for their bad service.
(Edited)
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Dances with Woofs

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You need to go back to traceroute school. It doesn't measure the delay between hops but rather total response time between the source (your PC) and the hop ...

https://major.io/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/RAS_Traceroute_Book_Format.pdf

Some traceroute implementation do attempt to calculate the delay between successive hops but it's as simple as subtraction.
 
Whatever data center you're talking about is at least 44,000 miles away and an 88,000 mile round trip to get a response  - just want to help you out before you get to court ;)
(Edited)
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ExSatUser

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I already got my popcorn though!
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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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Is it Friday already?

I'm all set for the weekend!
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Will Seemore

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I wonder if there are any tech geniuses out there that have tried to defeat the throttling and have succeeded? Of course they would have to keep that to themselves.
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clizity

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Thank you for your reply first off I am not trying to defeat throttling and I don't have a issue I had a question. I am using the satellite system for a remote two-way radio system used with emergency services and I'm trying to figure out which techniques are used for throttling whether it is a qos, tipping point,or if it's some other way of throttling such as dropping packets. At this location I am using protocols such as sip VoIP radio over IP PTT relay and point-to-point tunneling protocol. All of which use very little bandwith but are ceptable to ping loss. If the majority of their packets are dopped then they have to renegotiate And have to relogin requiring enough time to lose a conversation.


Thank you in advance thank you for your time but perhaps this was not the appropriate place to post question like this.
(Edited)
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ExSatUser

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Definitely not good. Maybe satellite internet isn't the best option for what you are trying to do. 
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GabeU, Champion

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It's likely that it's a coincidence, a glitch, or you're experiencing some type of problem.  Dropping data packets would not be their throttling technique.  The throttling would most likely be via some type of dynamic metering.  
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Oliver

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No Viasat drops packets....taking another pub up does seem to help as it's seems throttling is per /32
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GabeU, Champion

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Dropping packets may be dynamically employed during times of congestion, but it's highly unlikely that it's used as a method of throttling individuals who have reached their data threshold.  
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SamsMusicStorage 1

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Gabe, it could be that they are playing routing games. As I said above, my signal routes through ten hops within their system before leaving, losing packets along the way. It's possible they are using equipment from the 90s. Nothing would surprise me with this company. I do know they won't fix it. This is their business model.
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Jon Jackson

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Viasat's throttling is vicious.   I went from "up to" 50 Mbps to .38 Mbps.   When I contacted support, they said my download speeds look great! 
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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Hello Jon, There are many variables that can affect speeds. Keepin mind that the speed you sign up for isn’t always the speed you get. Rather,you can get up to the listed speed; your available bandwidth canbe affected by other households’ network demand, your own hardware andyour provider’s infrastructure quality, among other factors.
Insome cases, like when overall network demand is low, you might even get fasterspeeds than you signed up for.

If there is congestion in your area your speeds will remainnormal except when the network is congested. Only when you have reached yourservice plan’s threshold and the network is busy, then we may prioritize yourdata behind other customers, resulting in slower speeds. As soon as networkcongestion clears, you’re back to full speed.

 
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GabeU, Champion

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Diana,

I'm pretty sure that the question is actually how it's done, as in the method used to do the actual throttling, not when and why it's done.  I realize that you may not be able to answer this question, as it could be one of those proprietary secret type things, but this is what's being asked.  Like with your kitchen tap: your water flow is controlled by how far open the valve is.  If you want to reduce that flow, you close the valve more by turning the knob or by lowering the lever on the faucet.    
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clizity

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Diana thank you for your response but just like Steve I believe you have missed the question completely. No reply is necessary I am convinced that this was the wrong place to post a question like that. Thank you for yours and everybody's time.
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SamsMusicStorage 1

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Clizity, they won't answer your question because these people don't know how it works. An engineer is ulikely to care. Besides, anything they tell you will be the same sort of half truths you see from Diana above. They are using classic marketing ISP bs that does not truly match a well routed and balanced system that is designed to handle the bandwidth. They are playing games.
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Dances with Woofs

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Even if they were fully truthful, few here would understand the explanation.Go over to viasat.com/legal and read the Network Management Policy - it's all you'll get in the way of explanation and it's easy to make an educated guess as to what techniques are being used if you have the technical background you claim. It's no secret that Viasat has oversold its capacity to the point where peak usage period performance is abysmal - the problem is that they can't increase that capacity without another satellite launch - the satellite itself is the bottleneck and adding additional ground infrastructure won't address that.  Once they oversell that fixed capacity, they're forced to make unilateral changes to the network management policy like those made in February of this year. During off peak periods, there's generally sufficient capacity available for most - unfortunate most work and are not able to utilize those periods.

Viasat engineers are probably like most engineers - they do care but their hands are tied and they aren't allowed to interact directly with customers. Instead we have to endure social media moderation rather than true technical support here.
(Edited)
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ExSatUser

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Viasat-2's failure is part of the problem too. By it not reaching its full potential, Viasat is in a tough spot with its residential business.