what technique is used to throttle Viasat2??

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what technique is used to throttle
Viasat2??


ok so yes I'm over my data limit so yes web pages load slower I get that. Tech support made that quite clear but what I could not get them to understand is that my ping loss to google.com is 79%. is viasat2 throttling by dropping packets??? I don't care about speed I do care about dropping 3/4 of my packets.

Any one know what technique is used to throttle??


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clizity

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Posted 4 months ago

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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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What is your issue? You stated you have gone over your priority data limit, so yes, you should expect to be throttled. Depending on the plan you are on, you might actually be experiencing the deprioritizing, which puts other data flow above yours for customers who are still within their data limits.
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mike barber

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I think his issue was clearly stated. He would like to get some technical information and it seems to me he understands throttling and priority data. I don't see the need to explain it to him. This happens all the time, you ask which way the blue bus is going and the answer you get is that blue is the most popular color for buses.
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Jim16

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I think Yellow is the most popular, right?
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mike barber

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Exactly.
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Will Seemore

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I wonder if there are any tech geniuses out there that have tried to defeat the throttling and have succeeded? Of course they would have to keep that to themselves.
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clizity

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Thank you for your reply first off I am not trying to defeat throttling and I don't have a issue I had a question. I am using the satellite system for a remote two-way radio system used with emergency services and I'm trying to figure out which techniques are used for throttling whether it is a qos, tipping point,or if it's some other way of throttling such as dropping packets. At this location I am using protocols such as sip VoIP radio over IP PTT relay and point-to-point tunneling protocol. All of which use very little bandwith but are ceptable to ping loss. If the majority of their packets are dopped then they have to renegotiate And have to relogin requiring enough time to lose a conversation.


Thank you in advance thank you for your time but perhaps this was not the appropriate place to post question like this.
(Edited)
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ExSatUser

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Definitely not good. Maybe satellite internet isn't the best option for what you are trying to do. 
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GabeU, Champion

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It's likely that it's a coincidence, a glitch, or you're experiencing some type of problem.  Dropping data packets would not be their throttling technique.  The throttling would most likely be via some type of dynamic metering.  
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Oliver

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No Viasat drops packets....taking another pub up does seem to help as it's seems throttling is per /32
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GabeU, Champion

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Dropping packets may be dynamically employed during times of congestion, but it's highly unlikely that it's used as a method of throttling individuals who have reached their data threshold.  
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Jon Jackson

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Viasat's throttling is vicious.   I went from "up to" 50 Mbps to .38 Mbps.   When I contacted support, they said my download speeds look great! 
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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Hello Jon, There are many variables that can affect speeds. Keepin mind that the speed you sign up for isn’t always the speed you get. Rather,you can get up to the listed speed; your available bandwidth canbe affected by other households’ network demand, your own hardware andyour provider’s infrastructure quality, among other factors.
Insome cases, like when overall network demand is low, you might even get fasterspeeds than you signed up for.

If there is congestion in your area your speeds will remainnormal except when the network is congested. Only when you have reached yourservice plan’s threshold and the network is busy, then we may prioritize yourdata behind other customers, resulting in slower speeds. As soon as networkcongestion clears, you’re back to full speed.

 
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GabeU, Champion

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Diana,

I'm pretty sure that the question is actually how it's done, as in the method used to do the actual throttling, not when and why it's done.  I realize that you may not be able to answer this question, as it could be one of those proprietary secret type things, but this is what's being asked.  Like with your kitchen tap: your water flow is controlled by how far open the valve is.  If you want to reduce that flow, you close the valve more by turning the knob or by lowering the lever on the faucet.    
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clizity

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Diana thank you for your response but just like Steve I believe you have missed the question completely. No reply is necessary I am convinced that this was the wrong place to post a question like that. Thank you for yours and everybody's time.