what is the purpose of the 6" coax between my modem and the cable from the antenna?

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  • Updated 10 months ago
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Gary Heiser

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Posted 12 months ago

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Steve Frederick, Champion

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It acts as a heat shield between the coax from the tria and your modem. It should be left in place.
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Gregory Davis

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Not sure if you got that length right.  Usual setup is the Antenna (Satelite Dish) is outside while the modem is indoors.  A 6" coax seems rather short?
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Gary Heiser

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It is 6" between the modem and the CABLE to the antenna 
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Brian, Champion

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Can you upload an image?
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Brian, Champion

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And I don’t have one.

I’d sure like to know what it really does.
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Steve Frederick, Champion

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It is only supplied with the WiFi modem/router
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Gregory Davis

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Looking at the "Coax Cable Connector" as it's labeled in the "user guide" appears to be an extension into which the outside dish's coax cable is connected into this.  Lokk at paragraph 3 on page 8 of the user's guide.
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Brian, Champion

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I don't have the WiFi modem/router. I don't feel so left out now.
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Markgc, Champion

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Maybe there is an arc suppressor device in the cable or something to bleed off static, in the long metal end.  Maybe it is a shield isolator,  looking at the black plastic band on the long metal end.
(Edited)
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Matt B, Viasat Employee

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Yes, we lovingly call this the pigtail.  And it's exactly what is stated above, a heatshield.  Removing it may cause the wifi modem to overheat.

The non-wifi modems do not need this.
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michael

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in the world of electronics adding cable length and or splices creates resistance that translates to heat . how does adding  6" of cable with a extra splice reduce  anything ? . its use can add resistance and heat and create connection problems unless the normal install coax is cheap and signal leak affects the WIFI antenna . so the solution is a 6" shielded buffer cable to reduce interference with the WIFI ?    
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Steve Frederick, Champion

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This is a special piece of coax which acts as an external heat sink for the  modem. The coax from the modem to the tria does not have a very high current, so there is no heat created in the coax connections.
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Mr.Anderson

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I am going to agree with michael and call BS on this heat shield thing.  The more logical explanation is that the little plastic grip at the end of the coax makes it easier to install on the back of the modem.  This also hopefully would eliminate people trying to over-tighten the connection with a wrench.
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Don Rybak

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Can another longer coax cable be used in conjunction with this pigtail to allow some flexibility in where my modem is located?  Due to where the original Wildblue modem was installed years ago I only have a small limited area.
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Matt B, Viasat Employee

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Yes, as long as the pigtail is attached directly to the wireless modem, and the entire coax run from the dish to the modem does not exceed 150 ft.