What are you guys using for surge protection for your Sat. modem and router etc.? Is a UPS the way to go?

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Jim16

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Posted 2 years ago

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Bev, Champion

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I have a battery backup for mine. My Co-op power is, irregular at best, lights have never gone a full day w/o dimming at least 2-3 times, any time of year, any weather so, for me I've got to have it to protect my equipment.
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Jim16

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How do you determine the kind to get as far as capacity or ???.
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Bev, Champion

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Look at the total wattage of the devices you are connecting, then go to the manufacture's website and compare units, they will tell you the estimated run time for each one with xxx watts. The one I have claims up to 4 hours on the box it came in but, with what I have plugged in to it, it gives me 1.5 to 2 hours. I have phone, computer, modem, router, printer, voice adapter, monitor, TV, DTV receiver and, one LED lamp all on my backup.

Convenient to move one plug when the generator kicks in and, bring this room back online quickly. Each room has an emergency plug for generator power and, the rooms with electronics have batter backups for the items in that room.
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Asti Rusty

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Sounds like you need a Transfer switch for those Emergency Plugs.  So when there is utility power, the Emergency plugs get power from Co-Op, and upon power failure, once your Generator kicks in, the Emergency plugs get power from Generator.  When Co-Op utility power is restored, after a slight delay, the Transfer switch returns to normal mode (Co-Op utility power).

Transfer switches are not cheap, but saves headaches when you are not there to do a manual swap.

I added a short-time delay to Load Enabling / Load Shedding system of Transfer switch so that Generator never gets hit with several simultaneous motor starts and full load at once.

For really large, non-critical load, I use a relay that drops out upon power failure, thus ensuring Generator isn't trying to start a 5-hp motor along with everything else.
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Bev, Champion

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Thanks but, if no one is here, it won't be for more than 12 hours. Either I am home or, my son is coming twice daily to feed my animals if I am away. If the power is out, he can move the pantry plug when he comes out, that keeps my freezers and refrigerator going, the rest doesn't need power when I'm not home.
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Jim16

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If no one is home when the power goes out does the UPS shut the power off to the devices at a pre- determined time?  I wouldn't use it to run the devices but to protect them from surges and outages.  Would I just need a surge protector for this or is a UPS a better choice?
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Steve Frederick, Champion

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I have a battery backup system running my modem, router, Exede Voice adapter, phone base station. I get around 85 minutes of operating time. he battery backup will shut down once the battery gets to its low level. I have a second backup for my computer, DirecTV dvr and printer, My tv is plugged in to the non backed up outlets. I think the battery backup systems provide a much better power protection than the surge protector strips, plus those little power dips and blips do not get to your sensitive electronic equipment.
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Bev, Champion

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I agree with Steve, a surge protector will protect form major spikes in voltage only while a battery backup also protects for low voltage and, most can be configured to what voltages cause them to provide compensation on either end as well as how long to run on battery power before shutting down the connected equipment.

An added bonus is time to save whatever you are doing when the power goes out, even if all you have is a small backup, it would give you 2 to five minutes at least before shutting down everything.
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Asti Rusty

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If you have Satellite Modem, Router, Switch, WiFi, ... in an out-way cabinet, like I do, make sure you plug cabinet cooling fan into side of UPS that provides battery backup.  
I know it sounds obvious, but I have seen network pros overheat equipment because they failed to plug cooling fans into UPS.
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Jim16

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Great!  Thanks guys.
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Jim, Champion

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I was once informed by Tech Support that the modem has built-in surge protection and it is best not to go through additional protection as it can cause problems. I was told this while on a trouble call recently. I know from experience that if you call and get a different tech support guy, he may tell you something different. Anyone know for sure?
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Asti Rusty

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When Exede recently installed our system.  The installer put in a RG6 Coax-cable surge / lightning block.  The block has to go near Breaker Box or Meter box that has a Earth Ground (not power-line neutral). 

The modem may indeed have built-in surge protection.  However, as a homeowner who has experienced lighting damage (at power-pole / breaker panels), I can tell you I want the worst of surge being suppressed outside the house, not inside. 

If you can afford it, a Whole Home Power-Line surge protector is good idea.  But understand in event of a direct Lightening hit to incoming power lines the surge from Lightening will not be completely stopped.  Which leads to UPS unit with built in Surge protection as final protection from power-line side.
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Markgc, Champion

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I very much doubt that additional surge protection on the ac line is detrimental.  Surge protection on the coax side could cause problems I think.
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Debbi Cobern

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We had our electric coop come out and put a surge suppressor on our outside pole and have had no issues since that five years ago. Before that we were losing everything from brand new refrigerators to brand new stoves! That has taken care of any problems with surges. We live in an area with a lot of electrical storms as well as old electric lines that should really be replaced up on the highway.