Video streaming trial

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 2 weeks ago
  • Acknowledged
Anyone receive an offer from Viasat to beta test a video streaming data saving feature? 
Photo of Bob Lexus

Bob Lexus

  • 322 Posts
  • 114 Reply Likes

Posted 4 months ago

  • 1
Photo of Oliver

Oliver

  • 317 Posts
  • 103 Reply Likes
It's just them pushing the video resolution "optimization" on the older liberty accounts?
Photo of Bob Lexus

Bob Lexus

  • 322 Posts
  • 114 Reply Likes
I don't think so

I am going to find out, if selected...
Photo of David Hurt

David Hurt

  • 1 Post
  • 0 Reply Likes
I signed up for it.  Did not receive anything different in the way of equipment.  If these was any change in service I think it got a little worse.  More loading.  Viasat just said the trial is over.  If I wanted the "new, improved service" it was $20 more a month.
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 213 Posts
  • 186 Reply Likes
Sounds like this is the new Viasat Flex Service that showed up in the revised customer agreement on September 30:

https://www.exede.com/viasat-flex/

which raises more questions than it answers ;)
(Edited)
Photo of Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314

Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

  • 3153 Posts
  • 2030 Reply Likes
I don't understand how this would work for many, like me, since I have no access to DSL, I have never had that option available to me because of my rural location.
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 213 Posts
  • 186 Reply Likes
Yeah, I just noticed it on my monthly trip over to the legal docs to see what's changed out from under me. It's mentioned in the latest agreement and the disclaimers.
(Edited)
Photo of Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314

Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

  • 3153 Posts
  • 2030 Reply Likes
I'm a bit confused by this, if one would have to have a DSL connection to take advantage of this, why then would that person even want to have Viasat also. 
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 213 Posts
  • 186 Reply Likes
Yeah, I'm struggling with what real void is trying to be filled that I can't already fill if I had DSL availability. The DirecPC model???
(Edited)
Photo of bubs

bubs

  • 27 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
Direcpc was my first thought.  But kind of a sorta load balancing, routing different traffic to the different connections, my guess.  Which would of course take load off of Viasat's service, and make gaming possible (which obviously would be with only the dsl).  Some benefit perhaps, more if the viasat download would be faster (but also faster to the cap).

Direcpc did work pretty well, except the phone lines are very poor here, that always disconnected often.

Perhaps they would offer a lower priced package to go with it since they aren't providing the full service, sort of.... *cough*....
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1229 Posts
  • 764 Reply Likes
I am sure there will be a commercial touting how great it is. Seriously?
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1229 Posts
  • 764 Reply Likes
It does sound like the old DirecPC service, but for people to pay for two forms of internet because each on their own can't satisfy a consumer, IDK what the market would be.
Photo of Corey Anderson

Corey Anderson

  • 102 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
The Viasat flex is interesting. Wonder if you could cut your ping in half with this? That could make Satellite internet seem a bit faster just from that. The only fixed option for me is 768K DSL which is ATT Uverse. I almost signed up for DSL recently because they were advertising 1.5M DSL to my house which I was hoping to be bumped up to 3M when the tech was here. I could do wonders with a 3 meg connection and Viasat business but once they drove the path of the line I was close to 4 miles away from the connection point. So to me it wasn't worth it for 768K. But I do wonder if they will try to make connections that slow work together. I'm currently using US Cellular Fixed Wireless and Viasat with a load balancer. Its the best I can do in my situation. The signal is weak here so I have to be within a few feet of the booster for it to work and stability is probably 98%. Viasat is actually more stable until a heavy rain but since I have a load balancer within a minute everything fails over to the fixed wireless. 
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 213 Posts
  • 186 Reply Likes
In addition to numerous mentions in the customer agreement, a little more info here:

http://www.rsinc.com/what-is-viasat-flex.php

Interesting that Brad's reply that it's an ongoing trial  has gone awol - perhaps it caught him by surprise and he's seeking added info - it would appear to be out of the trial stage.
(Edited)
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1229 Posts
  • 764 Reply Likes
Definitely like the old DirecPC. Use the DSL to cut down the latency.

They say "no extra cost" at this time, but that is subject to change.

Still, a person needs to pay for DSL and Viasat. Shelling out a lot of money to make your internet more effective since neither on their own can satisfy a consumer apparently.
(Edited)
Photo of bubs

bubs

  • 27 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
Perhaps Brad gave out too many details and was canned.  Circle the wagons and get out the pitchforks "fellas".

Yeah, no dsl here either, like many here.  Actually, I have little doubt Viasat works almost as well, or rather as poorly as DSL in town these days on its own (DSL cuts out and doesn't really stream in town, let alone at the ends of the lines).  Haven't seen the Viasat's service for a fair amount of time since they're double the price for half the data and half the advertised up to speed as the competition, competition came in with upgraded service, so people switched.

Someone getting the service here that has access to DSL would have an interesting bill.  $85 for up to 5 meg (and poor) service.  Plus Viasat's fees, about $110 for the cheapest plan, up to 12 meg, 35 GB data threshold, and 360p.  But, it says in VS2 areas only anyway.  A combination of the two with traffic management would ~probably work better than either on their own though, as it should....  I'd think trying to get 2 DSL lines would be better though (or DSL plus wireless, as DSL areas would probably be a bit more likely to have cell service than non-DSL areas).
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 213 Posts
  • 186 Reply Likes
Nah, Brad just said it was an ongoing trial with no additional details - you had to be here ;)

Regardless it ain't happening where I'm at.
(Edited)
Photo of Robin

Robin

  • 77 Posts
  • 18 Reply Likes
maybe I already have it in my area or it has been implemented.  I get great video streaming....wonderful
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
No DSL in my area, all the phone lines are the old school type which won't support DSL. What do they charge for DSL these days? You know full well Viasat will charge for Viasat flex in the future. So with Viasat flex you are paying your original Viasat monthly bill, plus DSL, plus whatever Viasat charges for flex. So some people will be paying close to $300 a month for internet, that is crazy.
Photo of Robin

Robin

  • 77 Posts
  • 18 Reply Likes
I wonder if it has anything to do with the great service Im getting?  49.25 down and 4.93 up this morning.
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 208 Posts
  • 181 Reply Likes
Only you know that as it pertains specifically to you. In addition to the questions for you above, you've repeatedly refused to answer what specific plan you have, what its data usage threshold is, where you stand with respect to that threshold, what modem you have, which beam you're on (a Zipcode would suffice), or any other relevant information which would allow others to gauge their experience vs. yours. All of those factor into what someone can expect from Viasat.

By refusing to answer those questions, you simply lose any credibility you might have.

Someone getting Viasat based solely on your advice and your view of the service through rose colored glasses may be severely disappointed and the options available to you aren't available to everyone considering Viasat. But that's OK right, no consequences for you because Viasat will be blamed for lying not you. 
(Edited)
Photo of bubs

bubs

  • 27 Posts
  • 10 Reply Likes
No proof that the person even actually has the service.  Plus, all the rudeness and name calling, I doubt many care anyway.

"view of the service through rose colored glasses"
Very true.  People complain about the complainers here.  Sure, some may be over the top, but most of the time they (well we), make true statements.  Prospective clients doing research should see both good and bad.  At the very least, it might inspire them to ask more questions, get better plan descriptions, etc. before committing to a 24 month contract with service that might not do everything they think it does.  I'd think a happy, or at least informed customer would be more desirable than many of the others that believe all the marketing, miss key details (like promo price, gamine), etc.
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
I would venture a guess topography makes a big difference in how big the radius is in a pocket of excellent service from a wireless connection whether it be cell wireless, fixed wireless or satellite. In my area I am pretty sure those pockets of exceptional service are very small. Very thickly wooded here except for areas that are cleared for farming. Even in the middle of a big farm you can have 3 bars of cell signal and move 100 yards and have 0 bars, go another 100 yards and it is back to 3. There are also places where I drop calls with a 5 bar signal in the same spot every time.

Pretty sure satellite internet is the same way, somebody 200 yards away could have decent service and your service could be horrible in areas like mine. Then you could probably go out in the middle of the Mojave desert and people 100 miles apart and all those in between get the same service.
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 208 Posts
  • 181 Reply Likes
Satellite simply requires a clear line of sight to the bird - proper alignment is crucial as well as some recommended amount of clearance on all sides of the line of sight (used to be 10 degrees on all sides)..

Proper install and align is most important.

I had an installer from central VA come out when roof was replaced to realign - he blew it on a side mount and signal kept dropping almost immediately after he left.

I eventually called my original installer (no longer does Viasat direct installs and only deals with NRTC since they pay better), who spent about 4 hours here - turned out that on a side mount the collar that attaches to the braces would slip -  he aligned, put a couple screw threw the collar to secure it to the pole and it hasn't budged since. He also saw that the pole wasn't plumb and straight which was giving him fits during alignment in maintaining a consistent signal. When I have problems I call him directly, I learned by lesson with installer roulette... more expensive but you get what you pay for. My service stays up except in the heaviest of thunderstorms, even with a fair amount of snow on the dish but doesn't like ice coating it.   

A quality install by someone knowing what they're doing can make a difference. Google "ViaSat Installation and Service Call Standards" - it's not as easy as it would appear - and some complaints here make it clear not all installers are alike (like the guy who did a tree mount). Find that document and you'll know what to expect from the install/service. Think back to your install, did your installer do even half the things that document states - my original installer did all of them. It took a bad one to screw it all up before the original installer came back and cleaned up the other guy's mess/mistakes.

Another neighbor had an installer come out in the dead of winter - no problems until spring when the leaves came out - it was aligned right through the trees on his property. No surprise to me when he asked why he could no longer connect and I told him it would likely be back in late fall.
(Edited)
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
Satellite simply requires a clear line of sight to the bird - proper alignment is crucial as well as some recommended amount of clearance on all sides of the line of sight.


Just asking questions. Why do people keep talking about ground based gateways and how weather in Nevada can effect a signal in Central Virginia, if just a clear line of sight to the sky is all that is needed?

People in my area are bailing out of satellite internet by the droves. I haven't had satellite internet in well over a year. Just a thought, I figured all my problems when I had Viasat were due to congestion, if all my neighbors dumping the service will clear the beam I could go back. So if you are saying topography means nothing to satellite internet I am either on the fringe of a beam or in an area that is extremely congested. I wonder what the reason is? I am in Ladysmith Virginia, if that matters.
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1222 Posts
  • 759 Reply Likes
Being on the fringe of a beam can be problematic. More prone to range fade and packet loss. I speak from experience, unfortunately.

But topography is not a factor as long as a clear line of sight exists.
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 208 Posts
  • 181 Reply Likes
You were on Beam 329 and are no further on the fringe of that beam than I am. Up until the policy change it was always congested for me also. Right around the policy change in January, it got markedly better for me on a Liberty Plan and has continued to improve - my guess is a combination of the policy change doing what it was intended to do (it wasn't simply to force people off although that undoubtedly occurred and folks are rightly upset about that)  and subscriber attrition as more options become available in this area.
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
Thanks for the info ExSat, so I now think Ladysmith Va is on the fringe of a beam and nothing will improve service here. If that is known why do they keep trying to sell the service here, when it does not work?
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1222 Posts
  • 759 Reply Likes
It "technically works" just like you have "unlimited data".

In other words, it works, but experiences with the service will vary. I know some people said Viasat would stay on before DirecTV. In my location, it was the complete opposite.

Dont miss that "ranging" during a storm anymore.
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 208 Posts
  • 181 Reply Likes
Doesn't appear that you'd be on 329 any more or that Viasat is selling plans on 329.

You and I are roughly the same distance form the 329 beam edge/center - in fact you're closer to the center than I am (it's an elliptical footprint) - center's down around Norfolk.

They're now selling plans on Viasat-2 in this area - different foot prints. Not worth it in my opinion.
 
Gateways come into play on the other end, not as susceptible to weather but still possible    

Full round trip is your modem  -> satellite -> gateway -> core node -> internet -> core node-> gateway -> satellite - > your modem.

Outages or problems at gateway or core node usually affect your beam in it's entirety .

Here's the full  329 coverage from satbeams.com (based on info supplied to FCC by Viasat and they only sold into the 1st 2 rings where signal was sufficient and usable:



Ladysmith puts you in the inner ring, I'm in the second which has lower signal.

Viasat-2, who knows? No public info. I have no explanation for why your service in Ladysmith would be any worse than mine on the same plan other than possibly quality of install. All things being equal, I would expect it to be better on 329.
(Edited)
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1222 Posts
  • 759 Reply Likes
Viasat-2 with its magical mystery beams. One has no idea if they can get on a beam that performs well, or performs like crap. I would rather do my research versus trusting what a salesperson tells me. What we do know is due to antenna issyes, Viasat-2 never reached its maximum potential. Now they are looking at DSL/satellite combo plans. That tells me they are at least worried what LEO satellite internet (with low latency) could do to their business. After years of touting how you dont need DSL and how satellite internet can out perform it, now they want to partner with it. All very interesting.
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
Good information, while I wasn't perfectly centered on beam 329, I was pretty close to center. Considering that why was my service so poor? I had techs out at least a half dozen times in the 5 or so years I had the service and I believe a couple tried re-aligning the dish. I had outages that lasted hours at a time even when it wasn't raining.
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
Good information, while I wasn't perfectly centered on beam 329, I was pretty close to center. Considering that why was my service so poor? I had techs out at least a half dozen times in the 5 or so years I had the service and I believe a couple tried re-aligning the dish. I had outages that lasted hours at a time even when it wasn't raining.
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 208 Posts
  • 181 Reply Likes
Don't know which is why this is so frustrating for many. If your tech was from the same retailer I called to have the service relocated after roof replacement, I can hazard a guess - they left my once stable install a mess. While the lead installer was on the roof, I had to explain to his helper why proper bend radius, drip loops and grounding (i.e. actually attaching the ground block to an electrical ground) were important parts of that cable run he'd been assigned. I'll never play installer roulette again just because I was in a hurry to get back online  and I maintain a working relationship with my original installer because of that experience

I had and have outages lasting hours, usually they aren't signal related but rather in the network entry or DHCP stages of modem reboots - occasionally the Web Acceleration fails to connect and things become unusable despite all systems being go. I don't bother my installer about those since he can do nothing about them anyway (and he no longer directly installs for Viasat just NRTC). My most recent problem is an increase in random, short duration disconnects ever since the modem firmware was updated a month or so ago.  Eventually Viasat will figure it out, just like Limu Emu.
(Edited)
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
The 1/2 dozen or so techs I had were self employed 3rd party contractors sent by Viasat. I did not go through a retailer. I never saw the same one twice and they ran the gamut in age and preparedness. Some had service trucks with every tool under the sun while one young guy showed up in a sports car with maybe a screw driver in his pocket.

You would think one of them would have been competent enough to make sure the install was done properly and there were no issues, bad connections, poor grounding, damaged cable,etc,etc.

About the only thing I remember them changing is I got a modem exchange two times.
(Edited)
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 208 Posts
  • 181 Reply Likes
One would think... but anecdotes around here over the past 5 years as well as the anecdotes from the old forum going even further back would suggest otherwise. I suspect ExSatUser remembers that photo of an Exede install on a tree from the old forum.

Despite being Wildblue examples, one would think none of the following should have occurred since the install standards were nearly the same back then:

https://wildblue.top/the-good-the-bad-and-the-ugly-satellite-internet-installs-gallery

  

(Edited)
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
I see the issues with most of them except the ones on the towers. I self installed satellite TV in a couple houses I lived in and found being around other antennas or large metal objects can effect reception, is that the case with satellite internet?
Photo of Dances with Woofs

Dances with Woofs

  • 208 Posts
  • 181 Reply Likes
Don't know, my first impression was those towers might sway closer to the top - might not impact satellite TV but satellite internet has a lower tolerance for that since being even slightly off you could miss the satellite's sweet spot by miles over a 22000 mile journey. I suspect it has more to do with requirements for rigidity of the pole mount and it's maximum height.

Unfortunately all of the reputable installers from the old forum who could answer, don't come around here too much. For some of them it wasn't enough to know what the standards were but also the reason behind those standards. This community isn't really conducive to rational discussions like the old one was and they tend to avoid this one since they are frequently and quickly called shills here - it's the community's loss and Viasat's loss, not the installers. Then of course there was one that was banned from here.

As the page says:

This gallery is a reminder to every installer that installing satellite internet service is just not the same as doing Directv or Dishnetwork TV systems. What works just fine with conventional TV satellite will fail with Wildblue and Exede.
(Edited)
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
From what I found satellite TV dishes don't like swaying either. I had a friend who lived in an area where high winds would kick up from time to time. He lived in a place with postage stamp sized lots that had a homeowners association with strict guidelines. You were basically stuck mounting them on the fascia boards on the back of the house. Even with reinforcement heavy wind gusts were enough to make the dish rock and that would cause the picture to pixelate. We both had Directv with the NFL package. If the wind whipped up at his place on Sunday he usually ended up at my house.
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1222 Posts
  • 759 Reply Likes
The old standard def DirecTV satellites had larger sweet spots and bigger tolerances. The HD birds have tighter tolerances and are more prone to losing signal is the dish is slightly off.

You use to be able to tune a DirecTV dish with a simple meter. Now it takes a much more sophisticated device. Can you still tune by the screens? Sort of. But you have to dither the dish to properly tune it. Didnt need that on the old standard signal satellites.
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 154 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
Thanks for the info ExSat, but it is not comforting. At my age and aversion to home electronics I don't want to think something that worked in 2004 won't work now with satellite TV.
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1222 Posts
  • 759 Reply Likes
It wont. I could point my DirecPC satellite internet connection in the 90's, but not a Viasat dish in the 2000's.
Photo of Stephen Rice

Stephen Rice, Champion

  • 2789 Posts
  • 1451 Reply Likes
I miss Deku. I wonder if Deku misses me.
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1229 Posts
  • 764 Reply Likes
Doubtful since she has never returned.
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 159 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
Who is Deku?
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1229 Posts
  • 764 Reply Likes
DEku WAs A forMER champion on here who made eclectic posts. Like some other posters, she became disillusioned with Viasat and moved on.

Big into anime too!
Photo of Oliver

Oliver

  • 317 Posts
  • 103 Reply Likes
This is Viasat getting around the wording for the gov rural access grants?
Photo of ExSatUser

ExSatUser

  • 1229 Posts
  • 764 Reply Likes
Good point! Wasnt thinking that way but that sounds feasible.
Photo of Homeskillet

Homeskillet

  • 159 Posts
  • 42 Reply Likes
Didn't I read somewhere they were denied grant money due to the high latency? It is interesting how the Viasat commercials bash DSL and now they are trying to team up with them. I wonder if some of the DSL companies will tell them to get lost.
(Edited)