viasat-2 speed after priority data exhausted

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I just ran out of priority data for the first time on my new plan (gold 50, viasat-2), mostly due to operating system downloads and updates. So far, speeds seem fine (7:30 AM Central time). I have 2 more days until reset on the 12th.

How's the congestion on this satellite in the evening? If it's not too bad, then I guess I don't have to worry much about running out of priority data.
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steve heller

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Posted 1 month ago

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Old Labs

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You really need to narrow it down to the Viasat-2 beam you're on; subscriber counts and congestion  will vary by beam - unfortunately Viasat hasn't published the beam map for Viasat-2 so the best we can compare is general geographic locations for Viasat-2.

Not much of a penalty here in Virginia when exceeding priority data during the daytime hours, but during the evening and weekends a there's big hit during congested hours when exceeding priority data - but that's Viasat-1 beam 329 & Liberty plan.

Compare daytime vs. evening speeds for the next couple of days...
(Edited)
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steve heller

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I'm in East Texas about 80 miles northeast of Dallas, if that helps.
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Homeskillet

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Only a person in your general area can answer your question. Sometimes a distance of as little as a mile can have an effect on wireless types of internet. The most accurate assessment you can have is to test it yourself but make sure you run out of data close to reset time, just in case it slows to being unusable. Also things can be a lot different on weekends and holidays.
(Edited)
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Old Labs

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Satellite is not equivalent to wireless - beam foot print, proximity to center of beam and beam load are the major considerations as long as a clear, unobstructed line of sight exists to the satellite -  if it doesn't exist then it shouldn't be installed. Quality of install is also a major influence - and there's lots that can be foobared by even experienced installers.

Mobile wireless doesn't require a clear line of sight but can be impacted by surrounding terrain, vegetation, etc. - in fact often the nearest tower as the crow flies  is not the best tower as I've recently found out in installing a signal booster. In fact it turned out to be 180 degrees from where I originally pointed to the nearest tower.

Fixed wireless generally requires a clear, unobstructed line of sight. 
(Edited)
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Homeskillet

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Satellite is not equivalent to wireless


I was just saying there are similarities. Not so sure about your vegetation claims as someone in here claims some tree trimming helped their satellite internet reception and that would be similar to how cell wireless internet can behave. Both also can be effected by congestion. I have a close neighbor who lives in a quick steep drop off in elevation in a heavily wooded area. Even though he is less than a mile from me his satellite internet service and cell service were similarly way worse than mine. Common sense would say his topography was equally effecting both services.
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Old Labs

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Viasat requires 10 degrees clearance on line of sight - that's to avoid interference from trees and vegetation. The only similarity is the lack of wires - which is not what wireless really means.

The point is don't equate the three technologies and in general as long as you've got a clear, unobstructed line of sight with satellite - you should be good. Try to understand what clear unobstructed line of sight means (heavily wooded is not clear line of sight unless you can get over it - depending on which bird you're looking at that's anywhere for 30 to 45 degree elevation). 

In fact, mobile wireless doesn't require a line of sight. I've got miles of trees between me and the cell tower -  the signal still gets here. Not a cell tower in sight unless I fire up the balloon and go up about 200 feet - it is balloon!. I've even sat in the parking lot with the entire Walmart blocking my view of the cell tower and had good signal as I monitored which tower was being used using a cell mapper. It's pretty interesting to monitor how cell hand offs occur even when stationary. It was only by doing that I could point the directional Yagi in the optimal position straight into a dense forest.

Each technology has it's own considerations and each user has there own needs and all have congestion issues since its shared bandwidth - base your decision on what suits your needs not over generalization in some public forum -  and don't forget the quality of install - all installers are not alike. Some are very thorough - others just want to get in and get out. Mines thorough but he gets paid directly for his efforts - none of this $95 nonsense which barely covers his vehicle expenses - you get what you pay for.

I now have both satellite and cellular and it will likely stay that way - cellular is actually much better during the day (less congestion on my towers) but satellite is better in the evenings as long as I stay below my priority data and the free zone helps me manage the combined data - 6 GB downloaded just this AM during the free zone so Viasat still has value. The towers are more utilized in the evening in my area with more congestion and resulting packet drops and retransmits. The same happens on satellite if over my priority data.   

Of course, I did have to invest in a signal booster for the cellular at $500+ - but if you want to dance, you've got to pay the piper - I suppose I could have demanded others pay for it through subsidies but I choose to live here out of sight of ugly cell towers ;)
(Edited)
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steve heller

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Wow, it is really slow in the evening. I got 80 kbps, or about 1/1000th of the speed I got in the morning, which was over 70 mbps.
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Homeskillet

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Is the rock bottom of 250 Kbps even functional? When I hit that low it seems combining that with latency I couldn't do online banking and many times could not sign in to e-mail or other websites requiring passwords.
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ExSatUser

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In my experience, once you go below 200 Kbps forget about doing anything. 250, depending on the site, might work.
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Corey Anderson

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250k you can still web browse but pics are slow. But also it may be 250 one minute and be up to a megabit the next. Sometimes in a few minutes you get up to 2 -3 megabit. Its all over the place. 
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ExSatUser

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Secured websites are hard to use at 250k though, if they work.
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Homeskillet

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Just got a Hughesnet ad in the mail, says free installation in my area. Also claims 1-3Mbps typical speeds if you go over priority data. Wonder how truthful that is? Looks like the max plan they offer is 30 GB with 50 GB on the 2am-8am free zone.