ViaSat-2 satellite, What's the status?

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When will we be able to see new package offerings with the ViaSat-2 satellite? Hughnet has been advertising theirs for months and we have been holding out waiting for Exede to catch up, but I'm sick of paying so much when the competition is offering better service and cheaper packages.
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chris

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  • Frustratedlost

Posted 1 year ago

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Andy Schack

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Still looking like Jan of next year. When it goes online, those folks who signed up with Hughes are going to rue the day.

Andy
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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I can confirm Andy is 110% right about that. 

Keep in mind Hughesnet's latest satellite is just more of the same, based on technology developed almost a decade ago (and technology basically stolen from Viasat).  Viasat-2 is going to be a completely new platform,  with the latest and greatest technology.  Now that is a double-edge sword.  You are going to be able to get the most advanced satellite internet available, but being brand new technology, there will be more bugs I am sure at the start.

Just ask yourself this.  Do you want a flip phone or a mobile device with the latest features and functionality? 

You have waited this long.  I don't think a few more months is going to be that bad vs, committing to a two year contract and regretting that decision.

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Bev, Champion

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Definitely, yes we wait a few more months but, oh boy is it going to be worth the wait. All I can say is Viasat 2 and, not far behind it, Viasat 3 is going to blow HugheNet's 10 year old technology away. Sit tight, it will be worth it.
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Gregory Davis

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I confess - I signed up with hughesnet Gen5 - but have kept my Viasat 1 connection as well.  The reason for this is that our kids (3) have ipad mini's, chromebooks (for shcool work), and access to one of my Windows 10 laptop which is used occasionally.  They go through our (Liberty) 18 GB sometimes within the firs 10 days of our data cycle.  On Liberty Pass they are still happy - read no complaints.  On the other hand I had to stop worrying about not being able to get things done (quickly) while on Liberty Pass and during the peak hours.  For the most part I was still able to get the tasks I needed to do while on Liberty Pass.
There are some other reasons I decided to add a second ISP to our options.  We have a small business that we have been operating on the second floor of our Cape Cod style home.  For the most part our use of Viasat was to communicate with our customer base via email and occasional Facebook paste.  Our business is "Long Arm Quilting" which is a computer controlled via software, DC motor controllers, along with a very sophisticated PC software.  Our original PC ran Windows XP and or equipment vendor had an agreement with Microsoft to use a specific version of XP.  The Vendor did not want these PC connected to the internet - in the event of a need for XP patches these were provided via a CD or the user could download to another machine then using a USB micro drive then walk it over and install the patch/SW upgrade.  This is now being changed - my wife and I atteneded a Long Arm Quilter's conference and the Vendor is now (in beta testing)  "CS-7" which encourages the use of the internet to share quilting patterns via a cloud service, buying quilting patterns via an on-line store, doing on-line searches for specific patterns,...
Anyway I could continue discussing other reasons why I have both Viasat 1 and Hughesnet Gen 5 but this post is getting LONG.  I will patiently wait to see what options Viasat 2 will provide with the hope that both the cost and capabilities will be attractive.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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I fully understand what you are saying. I have redundant internet connections too, although one is Exede and the other is Verizon. That way events, such as weather that might impact all my satellite connections will not impact all connections.
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Alex, Viasat Corporate Communications

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The latest report from our satellite fleet folks is that Viasat-2 is right on schedule to reach its orbital slot at the end of November. Boeing Space Systems then has several weeks of testing and tweaking to do before they hand it over to us around Christmastime. In January we'll be testing and tweaking with our ground system, with service launch planned for Feb/March. Look for speeds up to 25 Mbps available in the entire satellite's coverage area, with higher speeds -- possibly up to 100 Mbps -- available in many areas. Data plans will be refreshed as well, with much higher data caps available. We'll have the details as soon as they're ironed out.
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Leo George Jr

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Hope I can afford it!
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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I am sure there will be a multiple plans with different pricing levels. After all, they have to remain price competitive with Hughesnet, their primary competitor.
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xode0000, Champion

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This might answer some of your questions: http://www.exede.com/blog/status-update-viasat-2-newest-satellite/
Keep in mind Hughesnet's latest satellite is just more of the same, based on technology developed almost a decade ago (and technology basically stolen from Viasat).
The following article confirms the theft of ViaSat's technology: http://spacenews.com/41781loral-agrees-to-pay-viasat-100m-to-settle-patent-suit/   Please keep in mind that, if Hughesnet can steal from ViaSat, then Hughesnet can also steal from you (and likely will).

Interesting that Hughesnet's latest satellite, which uses ViaSat's stolen technology, has only 110 Gbps throughput as opposed to the current 140 Gbps throughput that ViaSat1 has.  So, once enough Hughesnet customers move from Hughesnet's absolutely unworkable legacy plans to this latest Hughesnet satellite, which likely won't take very long, then there will be an even worse crunch for those Hughesnet customers than what you are currently seeing with your Exede service.  Further, that crunch will likely be permanent, since Hughesnet has no new technology to step up to.

ViaSat, by contrast, has ViaSat2 already on its way to add to what ViaSat1 already provides, and ViaSat2 will more then double ViaSat's throughput capability.  Further, there is also ViaSat3 to look forward to.  Based on this, I would say that Exede is the preferred choice.
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C0RR0SIVE

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I love how words are spun around...  Hughesnet didn't exactly steal anything from VSAT, SSL made claims that they owned the technology and was building both birds for Hughes and VSAT at the same time.  Yeah, it was a crappy thing to do, and VSAT didn't deserve to have that happen to them, but, they settled for what they felt was appropriate with SSL.

Of course Hughes would buy the technology if SSL offered it with claims that it was technology developed by them(SSL), do you think the lawyers at Hughes and Echostar would have allowed such a thing if they knew with-out a doubt it was patented technology from Viasat?  Of course they wouldn't, it would open a can of worms in lawsuits and patent infringements for Hughes.  Hence why VSAT didn't go after Hughes and Echostar.

Also, Echostar-19 has a good deal more than 110Gbps of throughput, some sources say 50% more, and others list Echostar-19 as being 200Gbps.
http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/jupiter-2.htm

Hughes is already working on Jupiter3, Echostar-24, which will have 500Gbps of bandwidth and launch in 2021.
http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/jupiter-3.htm and https://www.spaceintelreport.com/echostarhughes-defends-viasat-dismisses-5g-threat-satellite-consume...

Face it, competition is good, every time Exede beats Hughes in something, Hughes does something else to even things out.  If Hughes or Exede either went under, everything would go very stale very fast for all of us.
(Edited)
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xode0000, Champion

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I love how words are spun around...
Hey C0RR0SIVE, spin this: https://www.law360.com/articles/531777

Hughesnet didn't exactly steal anything from VSAT, SSL made claims that they owned the technology and was building both birds for Hughes and VSAT at the same time.
Oh, really?  How about (or are you going to try to claim that those patents don't belong to ViaSat).  SSL made those claims but ViaSat got the jury award because SSL's claims are false:




do you think the lawyers at Hughes and Echostar would have allowed such a thing if they knew with-out a doubt it was patented technology from Viasat?
Of course they would.  You have to remember that these attorneys belong to the same aristocracy as the judges who control the fraudulent courts.  So, these attorneys knew that, even if ViaSat got a jury award, that it would be (illegally) overturned on appeal, and that is exactly what happened.  There is a very nasty parallel from many years ago, namely the Ford pinto case.

Hence why VSAT didn't go after Hughes and Echostar..
Because ViaSat's contract was with SSL and it was SSL that stole their patents and gave the technology to HughesNet and Echostar, almost certainly by violating a non disclosure agreement.
...but, they settled for what they felt was appropriate with SSL.
Correction: ViaSat took the 100 million because it was either that or be completely ripped off.  I personally know that the courts in the United States are a complete fraud, and have an agenda of their own, so I'm not surprised by how those fraudulent courts gave ViaSat the shaft.

Hughes is already working on Jupiter3, Echostar-24, which will have 500Gbps of bandwidth and launch in 2021.
And I wonder who they stole that from, or are they perhaps working off of extensions of what they stole from ViaSat.

Face it, competition is good...
...and some of the competitors are thieves by nature.  Personally, I'll go with the provider that isn't a thief.
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J&J

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And now the question that has not been asked...

We've just been told how ViaSat-2 will be superior to VSAT-1.

Will the subscribers that remain on ViaSat-1 have the same speeds and plans available to them that will be offered to those that utilize VSAT-2?
 
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xode0000, Champion

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Once ViaSat2 comes online, it will for certain take much, if not most, of the load off of ViaSat1.  How much of an increase in speeds and plans that will mean for those who remain on ViaSat1, I have no way of knowing.  My first guess would be that the speeds and plans will not be exactly the same, but they will be comparable.
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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Craig,  The speeds will improve for all of our subscribers.
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Bev, Champion

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With Dish or DirectTV, you need to make sure the receiver is NOT able to connect to the internet PERIOD. Not only will they use your Exede data for On Demand, they will record On Demand programs if set to record all episodes - and that means streaming even when you are not home and, the TV is turned off. They will also UPLOAD your recorded shows to the mobile app, if someone choose to watch one on their mobile device - thereby using more of your Exede data.

If you want to conserver your data, make sure the TV receivers cannot connect to the internet. (allowing them to use the router for whole home is fine, but use parental controls to block them from the internet at all times. If you can't do it without connecting on the TV, then it will use data and, if the receiver cannot connect, it can't do anything that will use your data.
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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Appreciate both sides  of feedback Gypsyrace and Rique,

I will say with a company servicing 700,000 customers there's going to always be some that aren't satisfied and as the case appears for any company you call for service sometimes you're going to get a rock star for customer service other times not so much. We do try to correct the later when we are told of such actions. I will formally invite you to email exedelistens@viasat.com as that will come to us directly and personally here in the corporate office and we can freely discuss the situation and try to better things for you for a positive experience.

I know at this point it sounds like a record on repeat but things are about to get REALLY awesome for Exede and their customers the new plans I know we're keeping tight lipped about but once we're able to talk about them I think a lot of customers that have been jilted by the limitations of streaming (or in your case VOD) draining their data so quickly (which it really does, it's impossible to disregard, it is a HUGE data hog) are going to be quite happy. Ever-evolving internet requires action and that multi-million dollar satellite we launched this summer is our response. Unfortunately it takes several months to prepare but early 2018 is looking very bright.
(Edited)
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gypsyrace

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Thank you Brad
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xode0000, Champion

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@ Rique:

I can use dishpointer to give me an idea based on those close birds, but I was trying to find out about what the exact elevation and azimuth settings would be for my zip.
There are satellites that are in orbital slots that are 1/10th of a degree from where ViaSat2 will be.  For right now, you should be able to use those to answer your questions of "If we are going to need to take some trees down next spring, it would be good to start planning now.," since the difference in values between those satellites and what ViaSat2 will be will be minimal.

There's also this: http://www.n2yo.com/?s=42740
The above looks to be very helpful, but what's unclear to me is does it provide the current location of ViaSat 2 (which is what I think it does) or does it provide the eventual location of ViaSat 2?
The n2yo.com web page tracks ViaSat2 in its current orbit, which is not a geostationary orbit, and "provides its current location."  ViaSat2 still has to move itself into its geostationary orbital slot and is not there yet.  Once that is done, ViaSat2 should then show up on dishpointer.com and also n2yo.com should show ViaSat2's eventual location.
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xode0000, Champion

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@ Rique:

I can use dishpointer to give me an idea based on those close birds, but I was trying to find out about what the exact elevation and azimuth settings would be for my zip.
There are satellites that are in orbital slots that are 1/10th of a degree from where ViaSat2 will be.  For right now, you should be able to use those to answer your questions of "If we are going to need to take some trees down next spring, it would be good to start planning now.," since the difference in values between those satellites and what ViaSat2 will be will be minimal.

There's also this: http://www.n2yo.com/?s=42740
The above looks to be very helpful, but what's unclear to me is does it provide the current location of ViaSat 2 (which is what I think it does) or does it provide the eventual location of ViaSat 2?
The n2yo.com web page tracks ViaSat2 in its current orbit, which is not a geostationary orbit, and "provides its current location."  ViaSat2 still has to move itself into its geostationary orbital slot and is not there yet.  Once that is done, ViaSat2 should then show up on dishpointer.com and also n2yo.com should show ViaSat2's eventual location.
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Rique

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xode0000, Thanks for your post - it pretty much confirms my thinking. Very helpful, I appreciate it!

Bev, respectfully, I disagree. We have Dish and our Dish receiver is attached to our router. We choose not to record VOD, or any content which streams. As for PPV, Dish has offerings that are on-demand (which will consume your data) or regularly scheduled movies and events for rental - the latter will not consume your data.

In our circumstance (and others may vary), we must attach the receiver to the internet or a land line in order to purchase PPV (one could call in an order, but our PPV tends to be impulse buys, so calling isn't terribly convenient). This applies regardless of if we are purchasing on-demand or just "normal" PPV. In order for the feature to work, you must have that connection. We do not have a land line, so our hand is forced.

As for Dish uploading to the mobile app, once again I disagree. The user can set a preference to sync with the mobile app or not. That pref can be set with the Dish receiver or with the app. It does not automatically sync recorded content to the mobile app - you have to explicitly tell the app that's what you want.

I do agree on one point. If you want to be absolutely certain that your sat TV provider consumes no data, sure.... disconnect. Just do so knowing that you are using a sledgehammer to kill what a flyswatter could also handle - and also knowing that you could be inconveniencing your use in other ways.

Rique
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xode0000, Champion

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I see the real problem here to be the satellite TV providers (Dish Network and DirectTV), in that they are not respectful of their customers' resources.  As originally set up, their services should be set to use no customer internet data, and then have an easy to use interface to let the customer decide what internet data to use, and when and how.  Instead, their services are originally set up to burn customer data, and then it is up to the customer to guess how to wade through cryptic menus to turn that stuff off.  Sounds very much like Microsoft all over again.
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Rique

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Again, that's not been my experience with Dish. None of the default settings consume data. I'd have to explicitly order a VOD movie or event rental, I'd have to explicitly link my Dish data with my mobile devices, I'd have to explicitly access remote viewing through mobile devices. Nothing that Dish does would consume my data unbeknownst to me. I'm not sure how these claims spread, but it simply isn't the case - at least with Dish, it isn't.
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Bev, Champion

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DTV, will, if your home receiver is connected and you log in to the app on a mobile device, upload recorded shows to the device and, if set to record ALL episodes, it includes On Demand episodes. Record ALL episodes is the default if you just choose record series.
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Steve Frederick, Champion

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When I had Directv, the DVR would use data on its own, without me doing anything, or doing the "Start over" or VOD stuff. I dumped Directv 6 weeks ago because of their ever rising pricing and now have Dish, with the Hopper 3 DVR. It has been hooked up to the my Exede internet and except for the day of installation, when the Hopper had to download software updates, it uses less than 4 MB a day. I do like the remote access features of the Hopper, and when I am at the my lake place, I do watch tv through the remote access app, either live TV or previously recorded programs. Naturally, when I am doing that, the Hopper does use 2 or 3 GB per hour of my Exede data, but this is to be expected.

I never use all my monthly data allotment, I am fortunate enough to be on the Freedom plan.

I have not changed any of the settings on the Hopper, just using the default settings.
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Rique

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Steve Frederick,

Thank you! That's what I've been saying all along. The problems mentioned above might possibly apply to DTV (I don't know, I have no direct experience with DTV), but have never been my experience with Dish.

I appreciate the corroboration. :)

Rique