This might help in keeping Windows 10 data usage under control.

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Apparently, Microsoft now has an "update catalog" where you can manually download Windows 10 updates: http://www.catalog.update.microsoft.com/Search.aspx?q=Windows%2010%20version%201607

Further, all of the large updates are "cumulative" in nature: the latest update replaces all of the previous ones.  Therefore, you can keep the automatic updates process off, just install updates manually every so often and save a lot of data usage.
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xode0000, Champion

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Posted 2 years ago

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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Hi xode0000,  Thank you for this information. I'm sure it will benefit many subscribers and save them data!
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GabeU, Champion

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Actually, this isn't a great idea.  When downloading from the catalog, you are going to download the entire file, whereas with Windows update, it's only going to download those parts of the cumulative update that are needed for the system.  Your system may only need a few parts of the cumulative update, so it may download much less than what you will do if you download the entire file through the catalog.  

The catalog is a great idea for those who have multiple computers, but not so much those who only have one or two.
  
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GabeU, Champion

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While I agree that having the updates for later use can be helpful, for most people it will end up costing more data than is needed.  Most people don't have any problems with Windows updates in W10.   Some do, but most don't, and for most this would, again, use up data needlessly.  

The best thing people can do to protect against hard drive failures is to perform system images.  A regular schedule for them is best.  I keep one per month for the past three months.  

If people have data to burn at the end of the month, then by all means, those downloads from the catalog would be a nice thing to have, but for the average user it's nothing more than wasting data.  

This, of course, is just an opinion.  

As for disabling Windows Update in services, yes, it works.  For the average user, though, it's NOT a good idea.  
 
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xode0000, Champion

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The overall impression I get here is that you are advocating blind trust in Microsoft.  I learned a long time ago that blind trust in Microsoft is dangerous.  Microsoft has always favored its own interests and agenda over the needs of, and its required commitment to, its customers.  An obvious example of that is Windows always wanting to "phone home," even though that means responding to unsolicited queries from the internet through the TCP ports that hackers most often use to compromise your computer.  Fortunately, one of the services the Exede modem provides is the blocking of unsolicited queries to all TCP ports on your computer.
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GabeU, Champion

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The overall impression I get here is that you are advocating blind trust in Microsoft. 
Downloading full versions of cumulative updates advocates no less trust than relying on Windows update.  Simply connecting to the internet with a Windows based device negates any separate trust with individual actions.  It's no more dangerous to connect to Microsoft's servers for an update, or to download a full version of that update, than it is to simply connect to the internet with a product using their OS.       

Contrary to popular belief, the vast majority of Windows users have never had a problem, or at least a substantial problem, with or caused by an update.  

The chances of a problem occurring by using a full version of a cumulative update are no less than getting the parts of the update needed through Windows update, and it's a false assumption to think that it is.
 
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xode0000, Champion

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I disagree.  When you download the Windows updates manually, you have at least some control, especially if you run Windows in a virtual machine like I do.  When you let Windows automatic update take over, you have no control.  If you have some control, you are not putting blind trust in Microsoft.  If you have no control, you are putting blind trust in Microsoft.

It is just like GWalk900 said: my network, my rules, or, in this case, my computer, my rules.  That's something that Microsoft refuses to recognize (e.g. "you need permission from 'Trusted Installer' to change this file on your computer": "Trusted Installer"?!, last time I checked, I owned my computer and not "Trusted Installer"; even the name "Trusted Installer" is insulting and disrespectful of you as a customer).  But then again, we already knew all of this, since Microsoft has always favored its own interests and agenda over the needs of, and its required commitment to, its customers.

I also disagree with your statement of "the vast majority of Windows users have never had a problem, or at least a substantial problem, with or caused by an update."  I am constantly made aware of problems that people continue to have with Windows automatic update, and not just from this forum.  Further, the problem has been getting worse.
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GabeU, Champion

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Well, we'll just have to agree to disagree.  
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xode0000, Champion

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So, it looks like Microsoft might feel compelled after all to not want to control customers' computers to the Nth through its "updates" program: http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-prepares-to-roll-out-new-windows-update-controls/?loc=newslet...
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Christine Conrad, Champion

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That will be an improvement, however it does not appear that the actual Downloading of the updates will be able to be scheduled, which is the bigger part of the update thing for those of us on metered data.
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xode0000, Champion

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Hopefully, enough consumers, fed up with Microsoft wanting to control their computers to the Nth, will continue to push back so that Microsoft will make it so that updates can be scheduled.  In the meantime, it appears (but I haven't tested it yet) that you can simply turn off the update service in services.msc and then manually download the updates as I described above.