roof mount not possible

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  • Problem
  • Updated 4 weeks ago
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Viasat installer came. Says he's not allowed to mount it on the roof. Sides of house are not an option either and he can't trench for the pole mount due to concrete around the house. 
I would have loved to go with Viasat.
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Dominik Weber

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Posted 1 month ago

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ExSatUser

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Metal roof?

What internet do you have now?
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Harvey Mueller

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Must be somethibg unique about your roof as most do go on the roof. Anyway glad you found this forum to experience the experience that is satellite internet.
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ExSatUser

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Not really. If a metal roof it cant be installed on metal.

I was just curious why the OP was so excited about getting Viasat and what internet he was giving up to get it.
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Harvey Mueller

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He must have seen the commercial or talked to a sales rep.   Yes I wonder too what he's giving up.   Maybe he'll peruse the board for other users experiences.  
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Dominik Weber

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I have a concrete roof, walls are not suited for mounting due to thermal insulation
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ExSatUser

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What made you decide you wanted Viasat?
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Homeskillet

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Why can't a satellite dish be mounted on a concrete roof?

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GabeU, Champion

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Most likely because doing so would be very non standard and would require a special type of mounting bracket that the installers neither have, nor could they probably get.  
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Homeskillet

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The only thing special needed would be a masonry drill bit and concrete anchors. You can use the same dish brackets. Items available at any hardware store. I was just curious what BS excuse the installer gave.
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GabeU, Champion

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The excuse they likely gave is that they're not allowed to, which is probably legitimate, but who knows? 
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Homeskillet

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Like I have said before, when I had Viasat the service techs ran the gamut from having a full blown utility bed truck packed with tools down to a guy who didn't even have enough tools to fill a lunch box. I will venture a guess the guy didn't have the tools and hardware needed to do a mount in concrete or didn't know how.
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Dances with Woofs

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Or it could simply be that the Viasat Installation and Service Call Standards don't permit it. To quote just a couple: 

Sloped roof mounts require structurally sound surfaces covered with asphalt shingles that can support the weight of the mount and the antenna.
Non-penetrating mounts require structurally sound, non-sloped roof surfaces.
Structural soundness likely isn't the issue but other conditions may be with a strict interpretation of the standards.

While it may be easy to dismiss standards as BS, they exist to ensure quality installs, while protecting both Viasat and the installer from later liability when something might go wrong. Installers who don't adhere to them assume the full liability risk and  most will err on the side of caution (unless receiving a papl dispensation from their dealer or Viasat).

If Carol's installer had adhered to them, there would have been no need for her to post:

https://community.viasat.com/viasat/topics/scam-to-get-more-money

Rest assured if a guy shows up with not enough tools to fill a lunch box, he's not prepared to meet all of the service call standards let alone the installation standards and I'd escort him off my property and direct him to the nearest Wawa where he could fill that lunch box.
(Edited)
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GabeU, Champion

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Exactly.  They aren't allowed to.  
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Homeskillet

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Normally the guy that came unprepared with "tools that would not fill a lunch box" would have irritated me but I am a do it yourselfer who is pretty much only weak in the area of home electronics. I can do carpentry, plumbing, auto repairs, I can install and troubleshoot industrial and residential electrical wiring. I own every tool under the sun needed for the jobs I mentioned. I just don't have the devices needed to check dish alignment and signals nor would I understand what the readings meant.
I figured other than a lap top and signal meter I would have anything the guy could need including new cabling, electrical cleaners and connectors. I just needed his knowledge for the most part.
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Dances with Woofs

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The fact that he showed up without the tools, approved materials needed to  meet service call standards shows he had very little knowledge to offer. The first required activity on a service call is to ensure the install is up to all required standards and correct - cant correct it without the tools an approved materials. Duck Duck Go is your friend on the standards and will point you towards much greater knowledge.
(Edited)
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Homeskillet

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That was the last tech I had out and he was very young, that is the only reason I cut him some slack for the lack of tools.
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ExSatUser

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For what these guys get paid for an install, what do you expect. 
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Dances with Woofs

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I expect them to do the job they contracted to do - if it's not profitable don't do the job at all rather than doing it half-assed. I contact mine directly and he gets paid much more than the going rate.
(Edited)
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Homeskillet

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I hear you but I understand why someone young and new on a job doesn't want to spend a lot of money on tools. In most trades that require personal tools a young person starting out is expected to buy tools as he goes along, not show up fresh out of High School with a huge roll away tool box with $10,000 worth of tools in it.
(Edited)
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Bob Lexus

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Where is the 'doesn't have the tools' coming from?

I don't read where the OP said anything about installer not having adequate tools.
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Bob Lexus

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Where is the 'doesn't have the tools' coming from?

I don't read where the OP said anything about installer not having adequate tools.
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Dances with Woofs

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Homeskillet's experience - we're beyond the looking glass at this time.
(Edited)
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Bob Lexus

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Cancel & contact a local Dealer

Bet you have a much better experience

Interview the Dealer; ask if they have IN HOUSE installers
If not, keep shopping
Tell them you have a concrete roof

Can either mount directly or use a non penetrating mount (few $$ extra)
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johnny c

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For many of us internet has become a necessity or possibly just a really nice convenience, not to the level of electricity or water, but very nice to have.

I work from home, but even at that, internet is still a convenience, I could drive to the computer lab and do my work there.

And you must have quite a house, and no doubt the integrity of your home, roof, walls, drainage, overall security is paramount and I would not tamper with any of that for an internet connection.

I think that the installer not being able to install Viasat, is a blessing in disguise.

Look for any other option such as a cellular hot spot etc.

If you have absolutely no other option and you MUST have internet then getting the line from a pole in your yard to your home can be done, a custom installation, of trenching to the concrete, using some sort of coping to cover the line, (possibly unsightly), but you still have the wall of your home to deal with.  Cable, FIOS and other hard wired systems still need to get inside your home so wall integrity will be compromised to some minor degree.

I'd have to defer to Bob, above's comment as to actual mechanical alternatives that may be available.

Based on your home construction, cellular if at all possible would be your best bet.

I'd hate to see you go thru all the potential additional expense for installation and get piss poor service from a company that makes up/changes the rules as they go along.

Don't go satellite internet unless you MUST have internet and have zero other options.

Investigate all cellular options 

Do you have a TV provider ?

Good luck do your HOMEWORK before committing to a contract!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


(Edited)
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Robin

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they installed to the side of my house. I didnt like where he initially wanted to install and he was willing to talk through several options.  My roof is cement tile which is too difficult to install.  He had to go back and get what he called an elephant bar, or a long horizontal mounting pole with a bend in order to get the clearance past the roof eave.  He did a great job on the install included the cable routing and termination and modem setup.  He did state there were install limitations like could not install on the chimney like we saw our neighbors Direct TV dish done.  Its a solid install.  We had a big wind storm and the connection operated great through it.  Maybe ask for a different installer who is willing to look at options.   ViaSat is a great system that I am extremly pleased with after almost 2 months and a big wiindstorn.  
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Markgc, Champion

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My dish is mounted on the side of the house at the corner and you can hang off it and it will not move.  You can also drill out or knock out a small area of concrete and install the pole and concrete it all back in.  There are lots of possibilities that can be explored.