Port forwarding stopped working

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  • Updated 3 weeks ago
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Hi.  Something seems to have recently changed (by recently I mean past several months) with port forwarding and I can't figure it out.  I have VS2 with the Spock modem.  I had port forwarding for a home security camera system set up and it was working fine.  Then, the one thing I know changed was my WAN IP which I know it does from time to time. No big deal, I could go into the modem setting and find the WAN IP and change it on my camera viewer application.  However, now the app only works if I am on the same network. Also, what is really baffling me is that my WAN IP from the modem is different than what is showing on the internet as my public IP.  This seems to indicate my connection is behind yet another router or upstream NAT which I am wondering if it is blocking my port forwarding.   I can confirm using port checker tools that my ports are closed. Anyone else experience anything like this or have any ideas?
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Tom Sellards

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Posted 3 months ago

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Bob Lexus

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Whatever whatsmyip.com says is your IP is, is your IP
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Tom Sellards

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Agreed.  Hence my confusion since my modem (and support) is telling me something completely different.
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Dances with Woofs

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If the router is showing a WAN IP different than that of whatismyip, it's typically an indication that the ISP is using carrier grade NAT. If that case the router's WAN IP is usually 100.xxx.xxx.xxx or 10.xxx.xxx.xxx.or 192.xxx.xxx.xxx (i.e. private IP addresses).

Perhaps a moderator can weigh in, get on the horn and  determine if Viasat is experimenting with CG NAT on Viasat-2.

If so, Google "Port Forwarding and carrier grade NAT" - it's not easy!
(Edited)
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Tom Sellards

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What you have described is exactly what I'm seeing.
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Dances with Woofs

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Only Viasat can tell you whether they're experimenting or transitioning to carrier grade NAT - I'm not seeing it on Viasat-1 (yet).

I assume you're just using the Viasat supplied modem/router combo device and not an additional third party router - if using an additional router behind the Viasat router you'd be looking at a double NAT issue which you can control. But if Viasat is now experimenting or transitioning to CG NAT on their side it means you're sharing the public IP with multiple subscribers as IPV4 addresses are exhausted. It's why Viasat should be also looking to IPV6 support.

It's a matter of where the sharing through NAT is occurring.        
(Edited)
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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Hi all, Here is a link that explains how the IP addresses work with Viasat https://help.viasat.com/internet/articles/General/What-s-an-IP-address-and-do-I-need-a-static-or-persistent-one  If this does not help, please call Customer Care at 855.463.9333.
Below is an excerpt
"Your private home network is also called a LAN or Local Area Network.  Within your home network, your router will typically allocate private IP addresses that start with 192.168.1.  The private IP address ensures your husband’s emails go to his iPad — not your desktop — and he can’t check out your Amazon shopping basket. "
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Bob Lexus

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When I look at my modem's interface, it displays 10.200.85.xxx
When I look at router's WAN interface it displays 184.63.22.xxx (same as whatsmyip)

So are you getting a private address in your router's WAN interface?
I have never seen a public address on the modem interface and is always different from the public IP
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Tom Sellards

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I'm traveling now which is why I was trying to get my cameras running again.  I'll post the IP variations when I get back next week.  Thanks for everyone's replies.
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Dances with Woofs

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Same here...

The modem portion doesn't require a public IP address since it's part of the Viasat private network and performs nor router functionality. The router part of the combo device requests it's WAN IP from Viasat's DHCP server.

Attach another router configured as a router to the Viasat router and you'd get a private WAN IP address from the Viasat router - hence the need for bridge mode to overcome double NAT issues. If Viasat is indeed experimenting with carrier grade NAT, you'd wind up with triple NAT in that case. Combo devices always make things more complicated than they need to be ;) 

 
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Oliver

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FYI Viasat is doing a type of NAT. Your public IP lives on a VM at the gateway NOT at your modem. Everything* is being forwarded.
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Tom Sellards

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I never did get this working externally.  It still works on my internal network.  My modem shows my internet IP as 100.127.###.###.  What's my IP on google shows 70.41.###.### as my IP. Using the 100.127 address in my camera config works while on my LAN which to me indicates the port forwarding is set up correctly but I'm being blocked before it gets to the port forwarding rule when trying off LAN.  I wouldn't think I need to change anything in the firewall config or add it to the DMZ.  Again, this used to work and the only thing that change was my public IP and then I've never been able to get it working again.  Any other ideas what may be going on?