No Better Usage Meter Until the New Satellite is Up????

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  • Updated 3 years ago
I just saw this -

" Exede Lindsey, Employee
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Hi Zane we certainly take all of our member’s ideas and feedback seriously. We appreciate all propositions, I will be sure to direct this information to our engineers for research. Good news is that that we do plan to offer more enhanced customer friendly features in the near future when our new satellite is up within the next year or so. Thank you "

Does this mean there will be no improvement in the meter until the new sat is up and working, probably in 2017? We have been told for months "Soon".
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david, Champion

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Posted 3 years ago

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zanne

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I heard that the new satellite is supposed to be up in 2016, but I don't know. I imagine it takes awhile to build and make sure its quite an undertaking to launch it. I'm actually quite curious now as to what exactly goes in to launching the satellite and getting it situated and making sure it stays in orbit. I do hope that the software will be ready before then though.
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Knight Rider

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http://www.spacex.com/missions you can see there that ViaSat is on the list for future missions do to launch on the FalconHeavy.  From what I have seen online it is do to launch summer2016 and guessing time its tested from space and fully operational it will be late 2016/January 2017 time it goes live and they get people moved over to it.  Part of the delay is they are building a satellite design that has never been built before with capacity that has never been achieved before  https://www.viasat.com/products/high-capacity-satellites also as part of it they are building an entirely new ground system to support the new bird.  Also as they have chosen SpaceX to launch ViaSat-2 SpaceX has yet to even test Launch the FalconHeavy. Even though the FalconHeavy has never been test launched and currently has no where to launch from SpaceX is already working to fix that and build a site to launch it from.  Matter of fact if you read here Elon Musk posted on their official twitter page that they are currently rebuilding platform 39-A (which was built back in 1965 and has launched vehicles from the Saturn V Rocket to the Space Shuttles just for a little history) to handle NASA's Commercial Crew and the FalconHeavy.
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zanne

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Thanks for the info! Let's hope that this time whoever physically builds the satellite doesn't violate the contract and make one for Hughesnet again. I mean, I know Exede needs some competition to keep it on its toes, but Hughesnet never should have been able to launch the "Gen4" satellite because it was essentially stolen technology. In case you can't tell, I despise Hughesnet. LOL.
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Knight Rider

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Its under contract with Boeing so I doubt they will breach contract.
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Knight Rider

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Also Zanne
geostationary orbit (GEO) is a circular geosynchronous orbit in the plane of the Earth's equator with a radius of approximately 42,164 km (26,199 mi) (measured from the center of the Earth). A satellite in such an orbit is at an altitude of approximately 35,786 km (22,236 mi) above mean sea level.
from google. Basically anything that is sitting and that altitude above the equator is stationary in the sky with relation to the ground.  That is why you can put your dish on a pole pointing in a fixed direction and never have to adjust or move it,  

Also that is why all the NASA deep space network dishes can rotate and tip the dish.  They are focusing on a fixed point/ craft in space so they have to be able to turn to compensate for the rotation of the earth.  Also that is why there are 3 locations world wide about 120 degrees apart to have 360 degree coverage of space.

And I apologize my posts are a little off topic but it addresses the questions that Zanne had asked.
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zanne

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Awesome! Thanks! I appreciate the info. It really is quite a feat to get the satellites up and make sure they don't fall and then make sure everything gets lined up with it. I know it must be extremely expensive and Viasat sunk a lot of $ in to designing the satellites. Exede employs better tech support/customer service agents and probably pays a lot more for it. Hughesnet outsources and had a company illegally build their satellite for them so they didn't have to spend $ on the development/research and had more to spend on the software end. I think that is why Hughesnet was able to have more advanced UI on their modem.

Trying to bring this back on topic, the software development requires many many man hours of testing, troubleshooting, bugchecking, etc.

I wonder if Exede would accept offers from customers to help design an interface that has some of the features we want (without compromising the security of the modem).