LEO Satellites

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  • Updated 1 week ago
  • (Edited)
While I am still pessimistic about LEO satellite technology, they are creating a buzz. And I like the sound of lower cost internet.

https://www.foxnews.com/tech/new-sate...
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ExSatUser

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Posted 3 months ago

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GabeU, Champion

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I saw a video of the sixty recently launched Starlink satellites orbiting overhead.  Pretty interesting.  
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Nathan Hart

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Fake news.
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ExSatUser

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(Edited)
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GabeU, Champion

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I wonder if it was some sort of attempt at humor.  
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fmj77

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Nathan, not fake news. SpaceX and Amazon's plans for LEO satellite internet service are being reported all over the place.
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Nathan Hart

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Sarcasm.
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fmj77

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I like that Bezos is focusing on the "unserved and underserved communities" and not on cities and towns that already have access to such services.
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TheCatWillStrike

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I wonder what the capacity of these satellites combined are. They better have a real good invention. Cause good luck if they only plan on giving people no more than 5-10GB of data. 
(Edited)
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Jim16

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"Each satellite in the SpaceX System provides aggregate downlink capacity of 17 to 23 Gbps, depending on the gain of the user terminal involved. The 1600 satellites in the Initial Deployment would have a total capacity of about 32 Terabits per second. SpaceX will periodically improve the satellites as later satellites are deployed."
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ExSatUser

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What are the life expectancy of these satellites? They are certainly going to have a rate of decay more than higher birds.
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Jim16

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I have read that 5 years is the expected lifespan.
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ExSatUser

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so about a third of the life of a high orbit telecommunication satellite
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fmj77

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They definitely have a lower life expectancy but according to SpaceX they are quite cheap to replace.
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ExSatUser

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They must be. For them to launch 1600 or so of them.
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GabeU, Champion

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Just as long as one doesn't fall through the roof of my house.  :)  
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fmj77

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LOL. I think they're pretty small and will likely burn up once they enter the atmosphere.
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ExSatUser

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If you does fall through the house, they are liable. Some weird international rule about space junk.
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ExSatUser

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Told you guys. People are already complaining about the view being destroyed by these satellites.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/scienc...
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Oliver

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Give them another few weeks and you won't see them at all. Sats still doing orbit raise so not pointed in operating position.
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Steven Bidelman

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This gonna put a hurting on the 22k birds, and Musk is no dummy, I would gladly pay the same gouging for better service, than what I have now.
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fmj77

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It probably won't affect Viasat too much since their main focus is now on government, military and airline services. Then again, if LEOs start taking a piece of those markets then it will most definitely hurt them.
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GabeU, Champion

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Is ViaSat getting in on anything having to do with LEO.  I know that HN has been building, and will maintain, some of the ground based infrastructure for at least one of the LEO companies, though I can't remember which.  So, even though they won't provide it, they'll still be a part of it, which will certainly help lessen the impact of the loss of customers to LEO.  I didn't know if, perhaps, ViaSat was doing something similar.  
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TheCatWillStrike

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Someone said they have feeling that Viasat will someday sell to AT&T. If LEO hurts Viasat, that may end up happening and then garbage plans for all of us.
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Alex, Viasat Corporate Communications

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Viasat is involved with satellites that operate in many different orbits, including LEO and MEO (medium earth orbit). We believe the large geostationary satellites that form the backbone of our network are the most efficient at delivering bandwidth affordably. GEO sats can use a relatively cheap antenna to acquire the signal, whereas satellites that 'rise' and 'set' need either multiple antennas to track them as they come and go, or more expensive antennas that can move either mechanically or electronically. LEO sat constellations, of course, require hundreds if not thousands of sats to cover what 1-3 GEOs can do, and they are often over water or other unpopulated areas. Ultimately, combining the strengths of different types of satellites can be the way of the future (imagine a LEO sat, for example, being able to bounce signal off a GEO rather than require a global network of ground connections). And you could divert more latency-sensitive apps to the LEOs while using the GEOs for more data-intensive stuff (like video) that's not impacted by latency.
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ExSatUser

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Alex is indirectly referring to this...

https://spacenews.com/viasat-starts-v...