It’s nice to be nice

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So my 4 terabyte Seagate USB drive started acting up recently. I got scared, ordered an 8 terabyte drive and backed up all of my data to it.

I continued to use the 4 terabyte drive and yesterday it failed completely. Upon entering the serial number for the USB drive on Seagate’s website, I found out the warranty on my USB drive had expired.

I opened the USB housing and removed the internal drive. After locating the serial number on the internal drive, I entered it onto the warranty website just to see if the drive itself might still be covered. Instead, I received a message saying warranty status could not be determined and to contact support.

I emailed the serial number to support with a description of my problem. Support emailed me back with basic troubleshooting steps to try and also saying the warranty for the drive had expired in 2017.

Below is the response I sent to tech support:

The issue is intermittent. When the drive fails it makes a chirping noise and does not spin or vibrate. When the drive fails, I cannot see it in device manager, disk management, or the seagate diagnostic tool.

I have restarted the computer and have tried power cords and usb cables from a known working drive. It still has the same issue.

I was hoping the drive would still be under warranty. Thank you for checking for me.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Posted 2 weeks ago

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Stephen Rice, Champion

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The warranty for the drive had expired in 2017 so I didn’t make a fuss. I expected nothing further to be done and I simply thanked the agent for checking the warranty status. I didn’t get angry like people on this forum seem to do every day.

I expected no further response from Seagate. Instead I got the response you see below.

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Voyager

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This is how quality companies treat their customers.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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True. But do you really thing they would give me a freebie if I called Seagate a bunch of crooks?
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Markgc, Champion

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I have had a lot of USB drives fail and every time it has been the usb circuitry in the drive enclosure that was faulty.  I would try plugging the drive into another usb "enclosure" or disk caddy and you may be pleasantly surprised.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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I am shipping the drive back. I won’t be keeping the drive in question.
(Edited)
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ExSatUser

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So Seagate will be enjoying all the content on that drive!
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Not if I can get it back up. I plan on wiping the drive before sending it off if at all possible.
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GabeU, Champion

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If it is, in fact, the enclosure that has gone bonkers, as in the controller and such, putting the drive in a different one isn't going to hurt anything, especially if you're just planning on wiping it.   With doing this, you may be able to clone the drive.  
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GabeU, Champion

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I have a $14 USB plug in drive adapter
Those adapters are very handy.  I have a couple of cheap ones that came with two of my Samsung SSDs for cloning.  They're very basic, and only USB 2.0, but they're perfect for when I just need to quickly check something on or transfer something to a bare drive.