Is the surfbeam modem gigabyte

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Just wondering if the modem is a gigabyte modem, if so would it be overkill to go with a netgear dual band 750 router? We now have a n 300 router, laptop is connected by ethernet cable. Any suggestions?
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Mark

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Posted 2 years ago

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Old Labs

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From a pure internet speed perspective, yes it's overkill. Rated throughput speeds would only be attainable within your local area network (LAN or your home) and not the wide area network (WAN or the internet).

A router simply allows you to share that internet connection with multiple devices and/or simultaneous users. While a higher end router allows more efficient sharing and sometimes management, it does nothing to speed up the one physical internet connection other than the sometimes perceptible local difference attained though that more efficient sharing.   

Although the LAN and WAN ports (the wired ethernet ports) of the N750 are both rated at up to 1 Gbps (that's bits not bytes). Dual band refers to the router offering two different wireless bands operating at the 2.4 and 5 GHz frequencies. Per the N750 specs, the 2.4 GHz bad is capable of 1 up to 145 Mbps while the 5GHz band is rated at up to 450 Mbps so that in theory you've got 3 separate networks within your premises (one wired and two wireless).

I can't find the detailed specs for the Viasat modems, but it's somewhat irrelevant with plan speeds of 12 and 25 Mbps. Even with the launch of the ViaSat-3 class satellites, only 100 Mbps to the user is being touted.

My suggestion would be to base your purchase decision on the other features the router may offer.

For example, does it have robust traffic monitoring and usage statistics (often viewed as critical for those on limited data plans); does it have strong enough parental controls for your needs; does it offer local file sharing through both software and a USB port (good for both file sharing and backup of devices locally - but avoid cloud enabled features).

From an internet speed perspective you're limited by the satellite bottleneck. Perhaps an analogy will clarify. In my area, and after many years of construction, the third lane was finally completed coming both on to an off of I-95. Now instead of two lanes attempting to merge onto a one lane entrance ramp we have three lanes attempting to do so with the expected results when those who are in the outside lane attempt to jockey into position. The planners forgot or simply overlooked the real problem, I-95 congestion - they're planning that now maybe in a few more years. However, I must admit local traffic has greatly improved at least up until the point where the jockeys decide hey I better start getting into the entrance lane.
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Christine Conrad, Champion

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Old Labs, thank you for such a good explanation of router functions.
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Mark

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That is sort of what I thought, and also answered my question about the next satellite, thanks a lot no need to waste money.