Install requirements?

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I need to know what installers will require during installation.

I do not want the antenna mounted to my house.  I can put in a pole mount myself, if needed.  I just need to know how high, diameter of pole, etc.  I can also run the cable from the satellite to the house and make grounding connections.  Where the cable needs to go into the house, I can either have a connector ready for the satellite cable or I will drill any holes myself.

I do NOT want an installer to come into the house*.  AT ALL.  I can run the cable from satellite through my wall myself.  I can hook up the modem (and my router, ect) myself.
If the installer needs to access a website or something during install, I have an iPad he can use from outside the house.

Is there a document that lists what is required of the installer?  Meaning, the installer has to do it and cannot let the customer do it.  If a requirement is just that something has to be done (and can be done by me), that is fine.

* it's really no one's business why, but my wife has chemical sensitivities and we don't want someone coming in who smells of perfumes/deodorants/shampoos/smoke, etc. causing my wife breathing difficulties.
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Ken

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Posted 9 months ago

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James Paramore

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I think the modem setup will require a hard wired connection, so he will need to come in the house or you will have to run a CAT5 outside to his laptop. 
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Ken

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Cat5 to outside is doable.
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J&J

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You have a peculiar install coming.  Here's the deal...

Pole Mount:  1-1/2" electrical conduit.  It measures 1.9" OD, just what the installer will need.  Cut it off so it's about 6' above ground when set in place.

Drill your own holes:  Fine, watch your aim and make it big enough to fit the coax and the fitting through the hole (3/8" min.)

Your own coax:  Not in this lifetime.  Installer will have RG-6U with full braided shield and solid copper conductor.  If you want to use your own it must meet or exceed his (think LMR-400-75 which is nearly 1/2" OD and needs their fittings $35.00 each).

Ground: Either an 6-8' copper-clad-steel rod driven down at the dish or close proximity to your electrical feed from the utility.

Installer can do complete setup and hand you the coax when finished for your to thread through walls and seal holes as needed.  May stay long enough for you to connect and verify proper operation.

There are 3 pole-mount installs here and the above specs passed every time.
 
(Edited)
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J&J

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Pole will need concrete making it more immune to wet conditions.  If you have hard freezes in your area, 3' down.

Cable can be threaded through bushes on ground  where it will likely never be stepped on or otherwise damaged.

A junction box is a risk.  Installer may say it's up you, just don't complain later if it becomes a problem.   The connectors installer will use are weather-tight so this might fly.  Getting his cable on the other side may be a problem since he won't want to stay all day while you run cable in/under your house.  His connectors need a special tool to install on cable ends so he's not going to just drop off some connectors for you to put on yourself later.  If the hole in wall behind the JB is large enough to pass the cable and connector, he may install connectors to a coax long enough to reach your modem and you do the threading after he leaves. This is all going to affect your 90 day install warrantee.   Again, you cannot use your own coax unless it meets or exceeds his.  Be ready to prove your coax is acceptable if you want to run your own.  LMR-400-75 is undisputed as superior but it takes time to get it.  Let the installer supply you with a length of coax that will reach, and thread it in later.

One BIG reason you cannot normally use your own coax is because the coax supplies power to the TRIA.  Junk indoor cable has a foil shield and maybe a couple drain wires.  This will NOT do.

The ground rod...  It's not that it's there someplace, the ground must be very near the dish and pole.  20' away won't cut it unless installer just doesn't care and puts your system in anyway.

When I have mine installed the installer is only here about 20-30 minutes... takes longer to assemble dish accessories and mount TRIA than anything else.
 
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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I wouldn't have a junction box. You are only asking for problems. The modem to tria connection can be VERY finicky. The more variables in the install, the more problems you could have.
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J&J

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Yup... That's why I called it a risk and that it would impact his install warrantee.
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Matt B, Viasat Employee

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*sniff*  Judge and Jury *sniff*  that was...  beautiful...  
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Ken

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Judge and Jury, ah, that was a point I missed before - needing the coax to run from the satellite to the modem directly.
So how do people deal with moving the modem indoors when they rearrange their furniture, etc? Having to use the incoming coax means deciding on a permanent location for the modem? No wonder people ask about putting it in the attic.

I think I will just build a weatherproof enclosure on the side of my cabin where I put the service panel. I can add a power outlet and set up the modem in there and just run a cat5 cable to a wall plate inside and can connect to my router from there.

As for the ground rod, you had said at the dish or close to the electrical feed from the utility. I have a ground rod at the service panel on my cabin. There is another ground rod at the utility pole 250ft from the service panel. I thought putting another ground rod at the dish might set up ground interference with the ground at the service panel (which is where the power for the modem will be coming from).

Worst case, if the modem needs to go inside, I can have him set it up outside with plenty of coax and route the coax thru my wall after he gets done.

Again, thanks for all the input.
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wm4bama, Champion

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Customer installations are not allowed for many reasons, not the least of those requirements are enforced by the FCC when transmissions to a satellite are under narrow specifications...All installers can, and will, supply and install a pole mount, run coax and grounding to specifications and must have access to the modem after installation to activate your new account and verify dish pointing and signal measurements are within spec..
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J&J

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Don't forget installer will need power at the install to run his equipment.

You can do everything except the dish aim.
(Edited)
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Ken

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Bev, I’m not necessarily looking to do a self install. Especially not the modem setup.

The installer should be able to manage what they need to do from outside. I can route the coax thru the wall after he’s got it all ready.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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If the problem is between the connection going into the house and the termination inside, brining it outside won't solve the problem. For instance my installer had to run some tests on the cable at the termination point inside.

But again, you know what you want to do. So proceed with your plan and hope for the best that there won't be any problems with your installation.
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Ken

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I thought it was pointed out above that the termination needed to be at the modem, i.e., the coax goes from the tria to the modem? So me pulling the coax back out for the tech to check it outside should work, right?

Edit: btw, I do appreciate your input.
(Edited)
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Yes. If you want to pull installed coax back outside for it to be tested, I guess that would work.

I have environmental allergies myself, but certainly not to the extreme you are describing

If you have a garage, you might want to consider installing the modem there. While not ideal, it might be a good alternative to all the extra work you are considering.
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Ken

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Thanks. I am still finishing the small cabin I built. Garage will have to come later (if at all).
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Oliver

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my installer failed to find a stud and just mounted to ply on my roof. failed after a few days. took the viasat online tests and just redid it myself. takes about 3-4 hours clicking next next but the test is easy if you want to do it yourself. gets you access to the evst tool again. and dont forget pole mount is part of the install cost. dont let them charge more for it.
(Edited)
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J&J

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Careful....  Pole mounts are rarely part of a free "Standard" install.  Roof or wall mounts are usually standard.  The installer isn't going to just donate a $52 pole + labor + concrete for the fun of it, that comes out of his pocket so be prepared to pay extra for a pole mount.
  
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Oliver

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Viasat standard install includes a pole mount if needed. if the installer charges extra its just him wanting more $$ for his time. I asked this question a few times just to be clear about it.