I’m retired. Watch about 8 hours of tv throughout the day on Roku. Is my Silver 25 plan sufficient..??

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  • Updated 2 weeks ago
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Installation is set for Tomorrow
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mike royse

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Posted 3 weeks ago

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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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It depends on how congested your beam is, and what time of day you are watching your TV, and at what resolution your watching it at. Evenings from 5 to 11 pm will likely be the most congested times on most beams.
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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Like Steve above, it really depends on the resolution and time you're watching typically. 8 hours a day does add up on data usage so if you watch after 5pm you'd probably be better off with one of the higher plans. Once priority data is used on these plans they see slower speeds between 5pm-12am which can make streaming difficult
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ExSatUser

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From my experience no way you will be able to watch 8 hours of streaming a day on a congested beam. Even a higher plan you would have issues.

Good luck. You will need it.
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mike royse

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I’m not a netflicks user nor a YouTube user. Primarily a couple of hours of News shows in morning and afternoon and 2 or 3 hours in the evening. In bed by 9pm. Assuming I have a good beam ( and I’m new to this lingo ) should my plan be satisfactory for me..??
New installation is Tomorrow morning.
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ExSatUser

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She canceled service 3 months later. I don't care what plan. Going from cable to satellite internet is tough to do.

https://community.viasat.com/viasat/t...
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bubs

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I was just confirming plan details. I'd think most people considering cord cutting would at least want 720p. And 60gb isn't much, but would last a while at 480p. But of course, watching that much TV would be a bad idea for satellite.

Overseas help desk, Viasat isn't US either.

Likely has other options, ... like us.
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ExSatUser

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Understood. You posted the start of her story, I posted the end of her story.

You are right. Satellite internet is not meant for cord cutting. Even Viasat will say that. If you cut satellite TV, cable TV, and expect to watch 8 hours of content a day off satellite internet, not sure any plan is going to work it is not unlimited data, and it is not guaranteed speeds of 25Mbps. We understand that. A novice to satellite internet might not.
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GabeU, Champion

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I have to agree with the others.  I wouldn't dump cable for satellite internet.  You're very likely to find that it was a mistake to do so.  
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GabeU, Champion

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I have to agree with the others.  I wouldn't dump cable for satellite internet.  You're very likely to find that it was a mistake to do so.  
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Admiral Korbohuta

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Cutting the cord for Viasat? Oh Lord. Big mistake. Stay with Centurylink.
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Homeskillet

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Agree with everyone else, stay with Century link. Especially in Phoenix Arizona, a person in a big city like that should not have to even think of using satellite internet. You would probably have a better experience than most satellite customers as you would not have to worry about rain or snow continually effecting your service. Cable that has issues from time to time is 50x better than satellite in most instances.

If you really need internet for important business during a down time with that cable you can always hit the public library. I did that when I had to check my business mail when I had Viasat when it was down. Even the libraries in small towns here in Virginia have computers hooked to the internet you can use for free, you just need a library card.
(Edited)
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Michael McDowell

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Verizon did have a Unlimited Prepaid Hotspot (data only) Plan a while back for $70 a month.  Don't know if it is still available.  I think a lot of the Viasat people who bailed out managed to snag it.  I did and it has worked very well for me!.  I kept my Viasat system but cut it back to the Liberty 12 plan and keep it as just a backup to the hotspot.
(Edited)
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Homeskillet

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Vertizon no longer has any truly unlimited plans, you get throttled to 600 Kbps after you hit your priority data cap. When I go over mine it pretty much is right at 600 Kbps as they state, where as with Viasat it is a crap shoot what will happen when you exceed your limit. Right now it looks like 75 GB for $55 + taxes & fees.
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Whitey

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I had the Viasat Freedom 125 plan and also switched to the Unlimited Prepaid Hotspot.  I was doing great on the Freedom plan, watching movies and even 4K videos and still using less then half of my 150 GB plan.  But then they had policy change in the plan and could throttle us at anytime so the plan was about useless after 5 pm.  The main reason I switched was the hotspot was less haft the price of Viasat and truly unlimited.  The Unlimited Prepaid Hotspot is gone now but if you are near a T Mobile tower they have a home internet plan for $50.  I still use the Viasat browser and works great.
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ExSatUser

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Same experience as you Whitey. Thanks for sharing. I too would still be a Viasat customer if they wouldn't have changed the plans terms and conditions.
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Homeskillet

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When I was with Viasat I think I was on Liberty 12, with 5 hours of free time from 12am-5am only paying $60 a month, my beef was the service was unreliable. It could not meet my minimum needs, it was constantly down or was barely faster than dial up and I rarely went over my priority data. I hadn't been inside a library since I first got internet in the early 90's until I got Viasat in 2012, then I was often in the local library to check my business e-mail and order business supplies. The library is only a couple miles away, but they had computer stations with cable and I had Viasat.
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ExSatUser

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I am curious to see what the OP ultimately decides. And if he stays with Viasat hopefully he shares his experience!
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Bradley

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My cable is slow tonight for some reason. I’m calling Viasat tomorrow.
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Bradley

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I pay for 400 Mbps.

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ExSatUser

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I just wonder if the OP got the install done? Hopefully we will get an update one way or another.
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Homeskillet

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My girlfriend has Cox cable, it has never even tested close to advertised speeds, but I have only run a dozen tests and they were either on weekends or holidays. It is "up to 300 Mbps" and I get from 50-150 Mbps when I test it. I moved into the distant suburbs just as internet speeds started picking up around 2000 then out in the woods in 2010. When I had cable it advertised at 15 Mbps
and tested as low as 5 Mbps frequently. The highest speed test I ever got from one of my residences was 20 Mbps on Verizon Wireless. I probably wouldn't notice the different from 50 to 150 to 400, it would all just be blazing fast to me.
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ExSatUser

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There is more than speed. You dont realize how bad satellite internets latency is until you are on a terrestrial connection. Like night and day in terms of response times. And of course you can play FPS games.
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Bradley

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I’m not sure I can tell any difference between 200 and 400 except on super sized downloads. With a large number of devices demanding bandwidth, I think the bottleneck now is the standard issue router.

I’ve ordered a Linksys 9500 just to see if it makes the network feel more silky smooth. Modem still runs on the Puma 6 chipset, so that may go next. I find the silky experience more satisfying than watching big numbers on uploads/ downloads.
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Homeskillet

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I know all about how nasty latency can be with satellite, many times with tasks that dial up would have no issues with. I think the latency combined with the slow speeds is what caused a lot of websites become next to non functional when I had Viasat. On everything from E-mail, to online banking to shopping I often would get timed out or error messages when signing in. I would get "Invalid username or password" sometimes a dozen times in a row before they worked. Of course on many websites a couple fails gets you locked out for a specific amount of time or requires verification sent to an e-mail and a password reset.

I work from home, sometimes Viasat added hours to my day. Stuff that took 5 minutes with reliable internet could take me hours with Viasat. Also note I rarely went over my priority data. Fortunately for me the library a couple miles away had cable. I was a regular there. Have been there since I finally could dump Viasat for cell wireless over a year ago.
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ExSatUser

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My old banking site never did work with Viasat. I dont know if it was the latency, the compression technology, or the site security that made it incompatible, but I had to access through my phone or at work.

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