I just signed up for RV internet

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  • Updated 11 months ago
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  • (Edited)
I called Viasat this afternoon and said I’m looking for a provider for satellite internet for my rv while I travel..... we talked about my needs, qualifications and chose a plan for me, we even talked about how good my coverage will be in remote areas. Now I look at the community blog posts and find that Viasat in fact does not provide satellite internet for RVers? !

Ok.... then why did someone just sign me up for it and what do I do now? Nothing has been installed, scheduled for Thursday.
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hanna

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  • confused frustrated

Posted 1 year ago

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privatejordy

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I can only assume that they thought you were stationary with no plans to move the dwelling even though it's on wheels. I'm thinking your installer will call in and cancel if you can't cancel before they show up.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Yea. Assuming you are not going to be stationary, you need to call and cancel your install.
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Michael McDowell

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Are you sure that you talked directly to Viasat?  
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Sounds like a dishonest third party dealer told you a bunch of lies so he/she could make a commision.  Viasat doesn't have a mobile solution available for us regular consumers.  
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Andy Schack

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More than likely this was a sales agent that didn't understand the difference between satellite TV and satellite internet and the difference between the way Viasat has beams whereas sat tv has full conus delivery with the exception of local channels. 

Andy
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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unfortunately I have to agree with the comments. At this time unless that RV is going to be in the same place for 2 years without moving, you're on a private lot and not on concrete and maybe with some potential blind eyes MAYBE that could be swung. I doubt this gets installed. I know that's a market that we'd like to see one day but right now it would require a service call every single time you set up camp which is far from ideal for us as a company and probably for someone just wanting to spend a long weekend in the mountains. We would like to see this one day but at this time it's not available for RV/Temporary locations

Did you call in DirecTV by chance to set this up?
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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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Gregory Davis, GM's internet in their vehicles is supplied by the Verizon cell phone network, as is the On Star service.
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Gregory Davis

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Thanks Steve - I SIT corrected.
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GabeU, Champion

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I understood that satellite tv is available for rv's and boats. Wouldn't the technological challenges be the same. In both cases a moving dish needs alignment as it moves.
Not really.  Satellite internet is far more complicated than satellite TV.  It's also two way.  
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GabeU, Champion

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I understood that satellite tv is available for rv's and boats. Wouldn't the technological challenges be the same. In both cases a moving dish needs alignment as it moves.
Not really.  Satellite internet is far more complicated than satellite TV.  It's also two way.  
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GabeU, Champion

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Come on, GetSat.  These double posts are getting REALLY annoying.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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The technology does exist for mobile internet via satellite to RV's. The problem is the costs. While planes can do it, imagine what the hardware would cost for one individual.
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אברהם סלומון

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Yes, it's been a long time and now so much has happened just not everything. Also, (if) companies wanted to do this service it would not cost all that much to have the equipment designed. I know because I can design a smartphone that gets high-speed internet by satellite with $1,000,000.00 and sell each Global Phone for $2,500.00 each that would kick every phones butt. Look up Zii Labs they design a chip called Stem Cell Computing I was partnering with then around 2009 to try and design a Smartphone.
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אברהם סלומון

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Google: LTE Satelite LEO we are steps away as from having this service.
(Edited)
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Is it the weekend?
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GabeU, Champion

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Is it the weekend?
It's close.  Just a taste, so far.  ;)
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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As far as I can tell here, for 51 million we can revolutionaize internet connectivity as we know it.
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privatejordy

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Yes, I have a King Dome In-Motion satellite antenna on my RV that works with Directv and Dish, although they work better with the first over the latter, and just the piece that sits on the top of the RV and remote is $2000 when ordering a custom built unit, and $1700 in the box, uninstalled, and that does not include the receiver, service or activation fees. I found out it's often easier to put a dish on a tripod than using the King Dome unit, especially in shady RV parks.

If you're planning to travel but you're not planning to reside in your RV, you need an affordable prepaid Hotspot, with no roaming. I have a nice unit in a drawer that I can use or not use, on the Go-Phone AT&T data system, but I'd recommend going with an area provider with the best 4g or better signal.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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I have s friend that uses the tripod option for DirecTV. Much cheaper and easier.
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Bev, Champion

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PVC pipe attached to the mirror bracket on a semi works for my hubby for DTV. Wish Viasat were that easy to aim and, that easy to make portable. Well it could be but then accounts couldn't be beam locked and, property taxes on dishes would just have to be based on the billing address, not the dish location.
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Gregory Davis

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Looking at one of my Camping World catalogs I see Winegard, King Quest Pro,...
These are roof mountable satellite TV options for RVs that will automatically acquire the appropriate satellite for TV viewing.  Note that they say "for stationary use only" a moving RV will have many obstacles that would block acquisition and also the constant swaying of the vehicle will also present challenges for technology developers.  Now for stationary use would be great once the RV is parked.  Not sure there is a market there for Viasat to journey into that market.  The equipment would have to know it's GPS location and which beam (i.e. frequency) it would need to use, ...
Or would it need to have to switch frequencies (i.e. beams) seeing as the satellite is 22,500 (+/-) miles up to acquire a good to/from signal????
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Matt B, Viasat Employee

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The problem here is your account is assigned to a particular beam.  It doesn't get reassigned.  If you are able to align your own dish, you'd be able to keep your service, as long as you're in the same beam.  When you leave, your dish will not be able to connect to our network.
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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My next RV is going to be a 747 or oil tanker just so I can get one of these:

https://www.viasat.com/products/mobile-broadband

and an unlimited plan of course...
(Edited)
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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Good Luck Labs! Those tankers are sort of a magnet for marauders

 
 
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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Yep, there always look to steal my WiFi...
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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On the industrial side I do know we sometimes work with oil and gas sites but that won't be through our residential team at all
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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If Old Labs had a 747, he would just need to add the Viasat in the air option and he be good. Probably better quality of service too!
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wm4bama, Champion

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No one has mentioned the FCC regulations that requires a very narrow error tolerance for ground devices to transmit signals to satellites..it's very tight limits to prevent the transmitted signal from interfering with other nearby satellites... the accuracy requirements are much less for satellites transmitting signals to receive-only ground systems, as in Dish and DirecTV..

If a company can one day design and build an affordable self-pointing system that meets FCC regs it will be an instant success..

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Jab

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Viasat teams with Bentley Motors to deliver secure in-vehicle Wi-Fi

Viasat is best known for powering fast in-flight Wi-Fi on commercial airlines and government VIP aircraft. Now the Carlsbad satellite Internet provider is dipping its toes in the connected car market.

Bentley Motors, a subsidiary of Volkswagen, said Tuesday it has tapped Viasat to deliver fast, reliable and secure in-car Wi-Fi for its new Bentley Advanced Connectivity service.

Available for all Bentley models in 2019, Advanced Connectivity will create an in-vehicle virtual private network. The cost and other details were not disclosed. Bentley said the service expects to deliver secure access to files, video conferencing, movie streaming and other business and entertainment content on the go.
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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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GM and several other car makers have had WiFi in their vehicles for several years now. $20 for unlimited data at 4GLT speeds.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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That's good as long as you have a 4G signal.

Of course, if one can afford a Bentley, I dont think it is a problem adding a Viasat mobile connection (similar to what is in a plane). Doubtful the buyer even cares about the price increase for that feature.

Now, given the price of some RV's and what people pay for them, that might be as big as the Bentley market too!
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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Tow the Bentley behind the RV and you hit both markets - RV'ers  need a way to easily navigate out of the Walmart parking lot at night to take in the local sites and fare and might as well do it in style with a bumper sticker that reads my other car is an RV  ;)

Of course, the article also states in-vehicle WiFi not Internet access:

In its deal with Bentley, broadband will come from cellular networks – at least initially. The platform can aggregate channels from up to three mobile operators to boost speeds and reliability. The Wi-Fi router and other parts of the system are located in the trunk.

I don't think Viasat even offered any satellite services of their own until acquiring Wilblue in 2009 and their focus was always on satellite equipment prior to that. Maybe they're regretting the decision to jump into the consumer market ;)  Then remember this statement from just over a year ago:

And yes, satellites are, and will be, a big part of our business going forward. We did, however, decide to de-emphasize and lower-case the “s” in “ViaSat” to foretell a future company that remains open to new technologies, while still paying homage to our satellite communications roots.


(Edited)
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Jab

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RE: Of course, if one can afford a Bentley

Think Toyota

Bugs on Wheels: The New Generation of Autonomous Vehicles

The new generation of connected cars — especially autonomous vehicles — will be a boom market for satellite, says the satellite industry. Not so fast, says the mobile industry. 5G is the future. Signals from space will have nothing to do with it. But, who is right? One? Both? Neither?
...
...
Pricing concerns are not reserved for the sky. At a recent satellite regulatory conference I attended in Washington, D.C., one speaker made a striking point. With all the attention paid to massive LEO constellations, it is rapidly becoming clear that the single most important success factor for LEO broadband is on the ground.

The U.S. market bought 17 million cars in 2017. To equip that many cars, the antennas have to be pretty cheap, as well as reliable, versatile, and powerful. Forget $50 thousand or $30 thousand or even $15 thousand per antenna — the kind of numbers that work for commercial aircraft or super-yachts. One company that has built this reality into its design is Kymeta, which is in tests with Toyota, and in serious discussions with other manufacturers.
==============

Kymeta Connected Car  - Kymeta's mTenna® technology and KĀLO services will enable a realm of brand new experiences from anywhere in the world

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wm4bama, Champion

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WIFI in cars/trucks works with ground-based systems using existing cell towers and the FCC has different regulations for these systems and assigns different frequencies and power levels that can be used, same for LEO satellites if/when they're operational..These systems can't be compared to existing systems that use geostationary satellites like VS-1 or VS-2 which require stronger transmitter power to communicate with those birds and is why the FCC has tighter regulations for these systems...