How much data does working at home use on a daily basis?

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  I will be working from home starting 3/23/20. My job has me on line for 8hrs a day. How much data should I expect to be using?
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MaryLee Lee

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Posted 2 weeks ago

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Michael McDowell

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What type of work will you be doing online?
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MaryLee Lee

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Data Entry and accounting type updates to accounts.  I handle about 300 accounts a day normally.  The Company Programs use a live entry system, so every field is updated as soon as I hit that Enter button.
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Michael McDowell

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I'm really just guessing, but I don't think the actual data entered would be all that great.  How big are the fields (and how many) that have to be updated on each account?  
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Homeskillet

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That is a tough question, I believe it will all have to do with the bandwidth consumed running the live entry system in the background. I use a live website through a place that contracts work from me. With out even downloading drawing files just leaving it live and watching the job board it burns about .25 GB a day in 8 hours. It doesn't have any advanced graphics.
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Homeskillet

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I use a lot less data for work then for personal use.  For personal use I average between 300 and 500 GB a month.  Now with no hockey or basketball the streaming will go way down.. 
Unless you state the work you do as usual your response is 100% useless. Go away!
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Old Labs

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It depends. What type of programs are these? Do these programs (or applications) run within a browser or are they installed separately on your PC or workstation? The second are known as web-enabled applications and only transfer raw data to/from  server. They are somewhat akin to SmartPhone apps that you download and install, and actually they are the predecessor to those phone apps but never really took off in popularity due to the complexity of distributed architectures. SmartPhone apps were developed to overcome the initial strict data limits of cellular plans. 

Think in terms of the differences between an email client running on your desktop vs one running within your browser (for example Outlook vs Outlook Live or whatever it's called now). A POP3 desktop email client is much more efficient than browser based email.

With today's tech, it's possible to create efficient web browser apps also but tend to be more labor intensive development trying to accommodate a plethora of browsers.

The web enabled desktop email client application approach can be very efficient since the user interface is pre-installed and only raw data is exchanged. If it's all text then not much data is required. More important may be whether you are required to utilize the Company's VPN solution in conjunction with it. That needn't be a deal breaker with a web enabled desktop app. 

These were the types of applications I developed for the DoD and if I can get them to run on those slow DoD platforms, a good developer can do so on Viasat despite its latency. In fact I developed and tested them from home to very secure VPN DoD facilities with no issues while on Viasat. It just took telling the network admins about the latency challenge so they could make some server adjustments. Of course in my case it helped that my DoD stakeholder was in E-Ring and rattled a cage or two saying work with this guy.

Explain your satellite situation to our employer (specifically high latency, slow speed, data limits)
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ExSatUser

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When I had Viasat I had the ability to work from home.  It worked "okay" and didn't appear to use that much data.  The high latency might cause things to "react" a little different as you enter data.  Also depends on your connection time.  Are you connecting via VPN (that will by nature cause a slower connection).  Or are you connecting by something like eWorkplace?  (that is what I use...it basically gives you the ability to "control" your office computer from home). 

I wish you the best of luck.  I think sooner rather than later politicians are going to realize we can't keep living this way and what comes will come.  Basically now they are just delaying the inevitable anyhow.  Some doctors are saying you will get it at some point (until a vaccine is developed of course) or our own immune systems are built up to resist it (which would take a lot more people getting it now).  On the bright side (if there is one), while this is certainly a deadly virus, it is not nearly as deadly as HIV (killed has caused 32+ million to die) or Ebola (which can kill 1 out of every 2 people. 

Stay safe!