How do they claim 30 mbps is high speed and faster than dsl? I have dsl at 100 mbps, and less $ per month. than

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HUH?
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Tim Taylor

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Posted 6 months ago

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David Ramos

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The government minimum standard for high speed Internet is 25 mbps thats why they can say high speed , not sure about faster than dsl.
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Tim Taylor

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I hate the way way they make those claims.
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Jab

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Technically, one does not have DSL, but rather VDSL2, or maybe G.fast.

Do keep this in mind...UK kicks USA's butt

3. Ofcom’s UK Home Broadband Performance report shows that average download speeds for residential customers are 34.6Mbit/s during the 8-10pm peak period, compared to average maximum speeds of 39.1Mbit/s.
==================

In 2011, UK prime-time speed was on average 4.42 Mbps, and currently 34.6Mbit/s

In 2007, average US broadband speed was 1.9 Mbps, and in 2017, 18.75 Mbps.

So, what's your download speed, during primetime...not a speed test.
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Tim Taylor

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it's fast enough for Roku, an Amazon fire tv stick, a tablet and 2 phones, all in hd and no buffering. And no slowing of data if we reach a certain limit.
Right now, I'm averaging about 75mbps.
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Jab

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RE: "averaging about 75mbps."

I seriously doubt that...like how about two 4K TV sets running

But many consumer broadband connections aren't fast enough to allow reliable 4K streaming. Amazon recommends at least 15 megabits per second, while Netflix advises 25 Mbps. But if other devices at home will be occupying your bandwidth, 15 or 25 Mbps alone won't suffice.

Stay with what you got...
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Tim Taylor

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Gonna
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Tim Taylor

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Sounds like bulls### to me.
(Edited)
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barg_

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Why are you posting here if you have access to 100 mbps DSL?  Satellite internet is for people with no  better options.  Where I am there is no DSL or cable, and many in my area have no usable cell service (Verizon is the only carrier, and US Cellular I guess (but not many use them).  Also, I live 15 miles from the village.  They have 5 meg DSL there, it works up to 8 miles from town.  At the end of the line it averages around 1 meg.  Also, the 5 meg service costs $50 per month, plus the landline is mandatory at $35 per month.  So $85 per month minimum for their internet at 5 meg.  I am glad your Internet service is cheaper and faster than satellite.  For many people it is not cheaper, and not available.
So, does Viasat say they are faster than all DSL?  No.  But they are faster than many rural DSL providers, so they can say they are faster than some providers.  That said, myself and most people I know would take reliable 5 meg DSL over 25 meg satellite service if given the choice.
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Tim Taylor

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I'm commenting on their tv commercial, that said they are faster than dsl.
I too live in a rural area. I was looking for something cheaper.
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Bev, Champion

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DSL is 128 Kbps to 3Mbps. VDSL2 is up to 100 Mbps, two different things. While it may be a technicality that not everyone is aware of, Viasat is faster than DSL, not faster than VDSL2 but, that isn't DSL.
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Gary

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I think that DSL caps out at 12Mbps if you are within 1 mile of the sub-station and gets notably weaker(slower) the further out ... So far as I know, 6 miles is the maximum distance you can be from a sub-station to get DSL (not as the pro flies but as the truck drives).

3 miles should max out at around 6Mbps if you have good line contains.
5 miles should max out around 3Mbps with good line conditions.
6 miles should max out around 1Mbps with good line conditions.

What the OP has is not "DSL" ... 
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Paul Adams

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I have 3 mbps (upload) dsl and my Viasat Silver isn't faster. But the only way I can use 2 devices simultaneously is to have both. I think Viasat is wrong to claim faster than basic DSL (if indeed they do).
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Tim Taylor

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S###, I'm sorry i questioned viasats commercial. I was just curious. All you people can stop now.
(Edited)
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Jim16

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I want what he's smoking.
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Danny Booker

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Now that was funny, thanks for the laugh!!!
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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I said I was going to ignore this forum after doing my IRS stuff, but couldn't resist.

AT&T DSL caps out at my house at 6 mbps.  ATT&T Uverse (basically DSL with a fancy name) caps out at 18 mbps.  

30 mbps is faster than 18 mbps.  Its simple math.

Ironically, I always had buffering issues when I was on AT&T.  I upgraded to 18 mbps and still had the same buffering issues.  

End of rant.  I'm tired.  Did my tax audit stuff an no more bickering for me.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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I am sorry I didn't catch this stream of posting sooner! :)
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Ronald Stricklin

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DSL is not legally defined. DSL is a means to send digital data over telephone lines. With the average speed in 2015 being 1.5 mbps per https://www.techwalla.com/articles/the-average-dsl-connection-speed  Broadband is defined as 25 mbps.
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Ronald Stricklin

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DSL is pretty much dead. In populated areas there's a race for fiber and then maybe some dsl areas will be upgraded to g.fast. ATT is in a race to get their fixed wireless product out there and they will be moving that to a 5g standard in the next couple of years. ATT is also testing airgig. Google is asking for unlicensed frequencies be allowed to be used with 5g frequencies may end up using that with project loon. Hughes has invested in one web. Elon musk is launching a one web knock off. And theres always some break thru coming.
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Jab

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Ronald:

Here are the fiber facts,  via our rich Uncle Sam

Via  Connect America Fund, Telcos were allocated federal monies to bring fiber to these areas on this map by April 2021. Map can be moved and zoomed to your location.

Money details can be found in this 1.5MB PDF: State, County and Carrier Data on $9 Billion, Six-Year Connect America Fund Phase II Support for Rural Broadband Expansion

Imho, I have a feeling US taxpayers might get ripped via some Telcos...like we citizens are in the dark, about these plans.  But, they have until 2021.
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Ronald Stricklin

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ATT is already ahead of the game with its fiber fixed wireless service which is being funded with the Connect America funding. 
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Jab

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AT&T snagged $427,706,650 to put fiber in the ground...1/2 billion dollars.
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Ronald Stricklin

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Which is no where near enough to cover the Territory ATT is required to with fiber. That's why they are only required to offer 10mbps down and 1 up. Fiber offers speeds up 1000 gbps and it's generally sold to consumers now at speeds of 1 gbps. ATT when they received the funds needed fiber for wired backhaul for wireless services and fiber to curb services. Now they are looking at switching to wireless backhaul. Fixed wireless is connect america from att. https://www.clarionledger.com/story/money/business/2015/09/02/mississippi-getting-million-broadband/...

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