Geo or Meo and will they ever go Leo

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Just out of curiosity does Viasat use GEO ore MEO satellites? And do they ever have any plans to use LEO Satellites? And if not the big question is why when future competition seems to being going th LEO route.
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Brandon Fisher

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Posted 4 months ago

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J&J

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ViaSat uses GEO satellites.  They won't be so foolish to use LEO because most of the planet surface is water and there are very few subscribers out in the ocean yet LEO investments are over water most of the time.  It's bad customer location economics.   GEO lets a company like ViaSat use spot beams and point all the resources where the potential customers are located.  It's also easier to keep 1 high-powered GEO satellite in position and operating than 4,500 LEO all over the planet.  Others might do it because it's quick, cheap and dirty. ViaSat builds for the long-term, much like space infrastructure
 
(Edited)
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Brandon Fisher

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But what about them using meo for like say i different type of sub for people who need lower pings from what i learned in class today meo is like the best of both worlds it seems. Just curious. I understand leo has to be replaced every 5 years.
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J&J

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LEO and MEO are 2 concepts that some engineers cling to despite the terrible performance issues each have.  They both are just plain crappy satellite types that cannot provide the bandwidth people today demand.  They both must operate on a huge space-mesh type system to provide a bi-directional data stream to the end user.  When a LEO/MEO sat is half-way around the planet, where's it's user data going to come from?  It's going to need to be fed by it's siblings in space, one sat to another until it reaches it's destination.  That will add latency and bandwidth issues.  How good must the mesh be?  They are always on the move so even the earth stations feeding them will need to be highly synchronized to make it all work.  What about CPE? (customer premises equipment).  LEO/MEO fly across the sky. I wouldn't want a dish that tracks a satellite and then has to spring back to a new position to catch the next one just appearing on the horizon.  ViaSat does make a flat panel antenna that can variable-aim about 170 degrees with no moving parts but I don't see anywhere they are licensing them to other companies to use. (Ask your teacher how they work!!  ok.. it's not a fair question, he's not going to know.  If he says it's a phased-array, he's bluffing)  

ViaSat built ViaSat-1 from scratch because NOBODY had made a decent satellite for Internet yet  at that time.  Now we have the ViaSat-2 and in less than 2 years, the first ViaSat-3 will be up and let's see LEO beat a Terabit speed with coverage of 1/3 the planet, all from one satellite.  There are good uses for LEO/MEO like GPS, it wouldn't work otherwise but that's the market for that  technology; gadgets, not home and business users that need dependability and high bandwidth.  GEO is modeled after the common flashlight. Why have hundreds of lights along a path to see where you're going (even if you're not there) when a single, aim-able light will show you exactly with greater brilliance using less power for the effect?

Remember... Prior to ViaSat-1, ALL internet-capable satellites in space were cumbersome hunks of junk with piss-poor performance, and ViaSat-1 is GEO as is ViaSat-2 and the 3 ViaSat-3's to come shortly.

Tell your teacher the present and future is direct-able beams, not tons of space junk waiting to fall on somebody.  We only need the signal where it will actually be used and it's even better when we can concentrate it on the customer's locations.

P.S. Lower Ping times...  If a specific application or an Internet connected device needs lower ping times than satellite can provide, that will mandate a terrestrial connection and should be considered in the installation cost prior to purchase.

Ok, time for recess. If you want more detailed  information, I'll need to get permission (not likely to be approved). 
 

 
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Brandon Fisher

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i appreciate the educational response i do but 2 things he is a Professor not a Teacher and second why does this whole post seem very arrogant. Not trying to start anything here i was just curious about they're choice. Im working on my masters in Biomedical engineering. And during my course in Bus system Analysis/Design they briefly spoke about Satellites. And that's what made me bring up the question.
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J&J

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I'm not pushing product, just what works the best.  Not intended to be arrogant, just showing true superiority that escapes some very qualified, knowledgeable people.
I don't intentionally talk-down to people or be condescending.  One never knows the technical level of anyone here so I try for a "one size fits all" level most of the time.   

When you get your masters, please consider visiting Agilent Technologies, Life Sciences, in Santa Clara.  There's some people here I'd like to have meet you.  I won't forget your name.
 
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Brandon Fisher

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To be honest i kinda from the start figured you would be the one to reply you seem to be a very knowledgeable person. Just curious but what field do you work in. And if your serious I'll bring it across to my wife i have a year to figure out where i'm going to go anyhow.
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J&J

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Cell analysis.  My section is designing a better Seahorse. 

Put a note on your next year's calendar and come back here.  I've been here about 4 years and I'll still be here here if I'm alive.  I have only made external contact with one person here and it was rather tricky not exposing prohibited information.