Faster than dialup

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I just downloaded a 248 MB file in less than five minutes.  Can't download stuff that quick with dialup!
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Posted 9 months ago

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Michael McDowell

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Two days ago I was lucky to hit 2Mbps on this speedtest!

Today:


What is going on???
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Casual Observer

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An email...
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Sophie Mae

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Hey Michael... I can't remember whereabouts you live, but I remember we're beam-neighbors. I thought you might find this article interesting:  https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2018/Q3/report-broadband-access-would-benefit-rural-areas,-state.html
(Edited)
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Michael McDowell

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Sophie Mae...I'm a little SE of Kokomo.  Thanks for sharing that link.  Duke Energy is my electrical supplier.  Saw where someone on here said they were getting fiber within the next week or two.  Sigh!!!    Sure would be nice!!  Have you been impacted much by these Viasat changes?  

edit:   Just read down a bit. Guess johnny c was the one I was talking about!
(Edited)
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Sophie Mae

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I guess Tipmont REMC is going to start laying fiber in the Romney, Linden, and New Richmond areas to bring broadband to over 1,200 homes: 
https://tipmont.org/news/item/fiber-internet-update

I live in Warren County. I sent an email to our REMC asking if they'd heard about the efforts of Tipmont, etc... and the general manager responded that the board had met to discuss what could be done to get fast internet service in our neck of the woods. I need to touch base with him, as that was several months ago. 

As for the Viasat changes: yes, we've been impacted. The first impact was when Viasat2 was being touted as The Next Best Thing To Sliced BreadTM, then the second impact was with the recent changes to the Freedom and grandfathered "Unlimited" plans (I'm on the Silver 25 150GB plan).

The first impact was most likely due to the beam becoming congested with the unlimited plans which preceded Viasat2 coming online, which I'm sure you noticed, too.

The second impact has left us with speeds so slow during prime time as to be nearly unusable. It's not all that groovy during the day M-F either, but it's allowed me to work from home when I needed to. 

When I first switched over to Viasat from HughesNet, it was fantastic. The first year or so was positively groovy. Then it all kinda went to Hades in a handbasket. :(
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Michael McDowell

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Just tested with Speedtest.  Almost 35Mbps down and over 5Mbps up.  Much better than the last few weeks!  Although, this weekend was pretty      s   l   o   w.  I'm on the Gold 30 150 plan.  
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johnny c

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Back in the 90's i asked one of my students, who worked for Verizon, when could we expect to get DSL out where i live, his response was, "Never", he was correct, never offered in our area.

Tonight, Viasat: 1.5 Mbps down, I've only used 12 G of my 150, too bad it is so pitiful in the evening.

But on a brighter note, the power company came out yesterday and marked the under ground FIOS cable path to my home.  Today they had a couple of crews stringing the FIOS cable from one pole to the next on the state roads and to the last pole on my lane. (the rest will be underground, because i have an underground power line as well, after the last pole they will run the underground for 1000 feet free.  To the pole was free, and since i am 998 feet from that pole the installation is free.)

So probably in 6 to 8 weeks, or sooner we should be on FIOS.

This service was never expected, the Broad Band initiative and the heads up work by our rural power company is making this a reality.

My so called 150G Silver 25 Mbps plan yields reasonable speeds during the day time hours, but as you all know after 5 PM it is ridiculously slow.

I am opting for the 2nd tier FIOS, 100 Mbps, unlimited data for 100 dollars a month.

They have a 50 Mbps, unlimited data for 74 dollars and the 1GB speed plan is 179 dollars a month.

Most Dish and Directv subscribers are cancelling and just doing the a la cart streaming, I'll see the performance before cancelling our Directv..

I hope some of your counties, power companies get with the program.
(Edited)
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GabeU, Champion

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You lucky bugger!!!  Fiber is a dream that will never happen where I live.  I have a better chance of getting cable, and the chance of that is 0.00000001%.  
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Bradley

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If the measuring stick is still dial-up in 2019 that should tell you all you need to know folks.
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aabbcc

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366 Celeron, I picked out one of those for some family. At the time, pretty fast.

First, TI keyboard type with cartridge slot. Second, Packard Bell from Sears, 40MB hard drive, I think a 286, 12 MHz. Third, Gateway p120, I think 16mb ram. Fourth, Dell p4 1.8 with 512mb rdram. 5, 6, 7 self assembled.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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If I remember correctly, the early Celerons were very easy to overclock.

It wasn’t difficult to take a 300 MHz processor and overlock it to 450 MHz. All you had to do was go in the BIOS and change the bus speed from 66 MHz to 100 MHz. Of course, your SDRAM had to be PC100 for it to work.

It was a very nice trade off for the lack of cache on the early processors.

Those were the days back when technology was still fun. Now we take for granted the disposable super computers that fit in our pockets.
(Edited)
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GabeU, Champion

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"A 366Mhz Celeron " ??? Maybe a 366Mhz Pentium?
Nope.  It was definitely a Celeron.  It worked very well for the time.  
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GabeU, Champion

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Now we take for granted the disposable super computers that fit in our pockets.
Pretty much.  Heck, my Raspberry Pi outperforms that eMachines by leaps and bounds, and it costs $35, plus the micro sd card, which is nearly four times the capacity and so much faster.  :) 
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Yep. The 366 MHz Celeron ran on a 66 MHz bus with a 5.5x multiplier. They definitely existed and could easily be overclocked to 550 MHz in a 100 MHz bus with some good PC100 SDRAM.

By that time, all Celerons had integrated cache as well.
(Edited)
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Chuck Mayo

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Last week, a 40mb file took me 2 hours 22 minutes to download. That's faster than dialup, too!
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Al Santayos

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Dial up didn't drop out a dozen times a day for up to 2 hours at a time like my VIASAT did.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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You never experienced a busy signal when trying to dial in? Busy signals were pretty common amongst most providers once AOL started charging a flat rate of $20 a month.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Party lines still in the 70's. Dont remember them still in 80's. Still was rotary in 80's and some touch phones could be switched to dial either way.

Where is my acoustic modem!!!
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Jab

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Telephone Party Lines Were Once High Entertainment...By 2000, according to USA Today, there were still over 5,000 party lines still in existence in the U.S., but the majority of them were hooked up to only one remaining household.

Major carriers wiped them out, but smaller telcos may still have them.  I'm aware of a person still with a party line.
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Jab

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Tommy Tutone - 867-5309/Jenny
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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I’m pretty sure my cousins in northern Louisiana didn’t get private phones until cell phones became common.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Nor the internet.

That is why your speeds are so good. If nobody uses the beam, more bandwidth for you!!!
(Edited)
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Ricky5

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Faster than dialup ain’t saying much.
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fmj77

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"Faster than dial up" is not an accurate comparison between Viasat and dial up. I downloaded a 35GB game a couple of week ago in a little over 5 hours over my satellite connection. If you tried doing that with dial up it would still be downloading after you're dead.
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GabeU, Champion

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It would take roughly 87 days to download 35GB on a 40Kbps dialup connection.  Can you imagine?  Three months!!!  LOL.

And I thought performing one of the major Windows 10 updates would be awful.

On my old HughesNet legacy plan it would have taken 52 hours.  SMH.  Now it would take me less than two.    
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fmj77

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Gabe, and that is assuming that your dial up connection doesn't disconnect during that period. Mine could never go more than a couple of hours without losing the connection.
(Edited)
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Steve Frederick-VS1/Beam314, Champion

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My dial up connection never was better than 18 Kbps, and as fmj77 mentioned, it typically would drop the connection after two hours. The ISP owner said that was programmed into his system so others could have a chance at getting on the internet. And all those times I would get that dreaded busy signal, no thanks. No more dial up for me.

Viasat works great for me, it is either Viasat or Hughesnet, no other options available at my house in the country.
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GabeU, Champion

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18Kbps?  WOW.  I thought the 30-35Kbps I would get with AOL back in 2002-2004 was bad.  It wouldn't drop out a lot, but it would drop out.  

When I had satellite internet installed I was happy as a lark.  The difference was amazing.  Well, the second day, anyway, as on the first day my upload speed was about 200Kbps and my download speed about 50Kbps.  The lady I talked to said she had never seen that before and switched me to a different transponder.  Whether what she said was true or not, who knows, but what she did fixed the issue.  Then I was happy as a lark.  LOL.  
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Voyager

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Not too bad for Liberty plan during prime time.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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GabeU, Champion

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When I first got internet it back in 96/97 it was from GTE.  Their application came on four or five floppies.  

By the time I got my eMachines desktop the MSN internet service that I chose came with it as a pre-installed application, though I can't remember if, at that point, I really needed to use it, or if I could use the built in dialer.  

How times change.  
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Sounds like Gabe is a newbie.
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GabeU, Champion

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A newbie?  Well, if you mean that I didn't first go online until 1996, then I guess I am.  But, when it comes to the internet, I wouldn't doubt that I got on earlier than the vast majority alive today.  
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fmj77

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The first time I ever got online was in 1995 or 1996. My dad was one of the first customers in his town to have it. I don't remember ever having to use a floppy or a CD though.
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GabeU, Champion

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I first went online in '96, using my brother in law's computer, but then my wife and I got one as a gift from her parents and we signed on in 1996. 

I remember dating this girl in 1993, with her telling me about this America Online thing and going into something called a chat room.  I had absolutely no clue what she was talking about, even though she did her best to describe it.  Had I realized what she meant I probably would have asked her to show me at her house.  Still, I wouldn't have been able to afford a computer back then, and where I was living at the time, being out on own for pretty much the first time, I wouldn't have wanted to have one.  I do remember the girl telling me that her father was really angry that she was jacking up the phone bill so much with going online, as it was by the hour at the time.  

Later, though, I loved chat rooms.  Yahoo Chat, and the rooms that you could create yourself, were awesome!  
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Traveling this weekend. While the hotel wifi was only 10Mbps or so, the latency is so low its amazing. You dont realize how bad satellite latency is until you have a terrestrial connection
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DavidBrowserGuy, Browser Expert

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We will take a look.
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DavidBrowserGuy, Browser Expert

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@Jab

You have identified 2 separate issues, which we have replicated here.

  • In an upcoming release, Viasat Browser will include support for hardware accelerated video decode, which should eliminate the stop-and-go-ish behavior with 1080p rendering that you are now seeing.  Viasat Browser is currently built off of Chromium 70; there is a new feature in Chromium 72 that supports this functionality and our team is already working on a version of Viasat Browser that is built off of that Chromium version.
  • The right hand side will load if you hit refresh, but that it didn’t load in the first place is a bug that the team is actively looking into right now and will address in an upcoming release.

 

Thanks for bringing both of these issues to our attention!!
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DavidBrowserGuy, Browser Expert

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@Jab

You have identified 2 separate issues, which we have replicated here.

  • In an upcoming release, Viasat Browser will include support for hardware accelerated video decode, which should eliminate the stop-and-go-ish behavior with 1080p rendering that you are now seeing.  Viasat Browser is currently built off of Chromium 70; there is a new feature in Chromium 72 that supports this functionality and our team is already working on a version of Viasat Browser that is built off of that Chromium version.
  • The right hand side will load if you hit refresh, but that it didn’t load in the first place is a bug that the team is actively looking into right now and will address in an upcoming release.

 

Thanks for bringing both of these issues to our attention!!
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Michael McDowell

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HA!  So even you guys double post!
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DavidBrowserGuy, Browser Expert

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ugh!
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Voyager

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Are there places that still offer dial-up service? I live in a very rural area of PA, and out dial-up all disappeared probably 20 years ago when DSL was offered.

Things are going pretty good this morning. Not bad for a 12 Mbps plan. I have come to believe that your average speed in inversely proportional to the number of complaints you post to the forum. LOL.
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fmj77

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True. New machines don't come with a dial up modem anymore. But I've seen adapters at Staples and Walmart that work via USB.
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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I remember when laptops started leaving out the floppy disk drive (with wasn't even floppy by the late 80's). I was like how could you do without a disk!
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GabeU, Champion

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VetSat,

I actually took the modems out of two of my old computers as I could see where connections were going at the time.  One is with a shorter back plate, as it came out of an old Gateway micro tower, but I could still make it work.  The other one is normal sized and came out of a Dell Dimension E521.  The only problem would be if MS ended support in future Windows versions.  Then again, there's always Linux.  

I can still get dialup here from a few different companies, including AOL.  
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GabeU, Champion

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fmj77, 

Those USB modems work pretty well.  My folks used one for AOL with their laptop from 2011 until 2016.  
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fmj77

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Yeah. I used one as well up until around 2012 or 2013 when I still had a landline. I kept dial up as a backup in case I had a problem with Exede.