end of net neutrality

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  • Updated 7 months ago
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The FCC has released the final draft of its proposal to destroy net neutrality. The order removes nearly every net neutrality rule on the books and removes the common carrier designation from internet providers.
What changes will come with the end of net neutrality? Portugal Doesn't Have Net Neutrality and internet providers are starting to split the net into packages. (see photo) Will Excede service continue be an open internet?                                                               
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John Rothgeb

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Posted 8 months ago

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Bev, Champion

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I hope so, if not, then what's the point of paying for Unlimited plans in the first place, if you have to pay even more to do what you want to do online?

I can see charging a premium to get HD and 4K video but, extra to access sites by type? Unless base plans are a lot less and, the total to access it all would be the same or less than the Unlimited plans now offered, no, not worth it. 

I hope they realize this is America and, we want our freedom, as we always have. 

Now if they add similar package to plans with data caps, thus restricting the sites that use the most data, like video and social media, sure, that could work but, restricting sites on Unlimited plans - NO.
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Judge and Jury

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The end of net neutrality isn't the end of the world.  I don't want to see it go but I'm not scared.  If the ISP s'  do stupid things that mess with us, we have so many people with Internet access that will make such an uproar, congress (those people that would hate to lose their jobs) will make changes that will quiet us down again.

The FCC has been saying the FTC will make sure everything is kept fair and transparent.  This is probably a good thing.  They will love their new powers and exploit them to the fullest.  The FTC might do a better job than the FCC did.

This is a case of let them do what they will do but....  keep that bucket of tar and those feathers close by, we may be visiting a few people.

 
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John Rothgeb

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Thank you for the answer. I live in a remote area and am hoping to get broadband service from Viasat 2. I would like to be updated when you know what service will be available in Inyo County,  CA. I am hoping for at least 25 Mbps and unlimited download.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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Nothing to see here.  I added up the prices in the original post and it comes up to $80 a month.  Exede's cheapest unlimited plan is $70 a month plus $10 modem rental.  

So if anything, nickel and diming is a good thing.  You can opt out of what you don't want and get your bill lower than $80 a month.
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Dan White

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I would rather put my faith in capitalism and competition to keep the net fair and transparent then the heavy handed control of the govenment that would stifle innovation and try to control anything that they find objectionable.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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I mean a total of $200, not an actual $200 extra each year.
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John Rothgeb

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The repeal of net neutrality is a victory for Telecoms.
In 55% of the U.S., there is only one major broadband provider and in most of the remaining 45%, there are two. That means that if that sole provider chooses to be the proverbial “bad actor,” there is no “free market” to correct their actions. If you’re a consumer, you have no other options.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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I got sick of AT&T and came to Exede/Viasat. Everyone has options.
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Bradley

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Bad and worse aren’t really options. It called pick your poison.
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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This is a very big news item right now and the debate is probably going to spark quite a bit over the next few weeks. The only reply I and my colleagues on here are able to give is that Viasat will comply with all laws including the net neutrality laws in place today. 
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Judge and Jury

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I like the "laws in place today" part...  Ha  ha, that's good.

OK, seriously now....  Viasat is not a huge telecom out to conquer the world.  They don't sell the public a myriad of different services and we can expect they never will.  Viasat actually depends on happy customers, or die.  The business model of Viasat is just not setup to strangle their customers with various exploits like a company such Comcast can/will.  I think we are all going to be very pleased we have Viasat as our ISP one day.  I see Viasat will be an oasis if/when the huge ISP's start taking advantage of the lack of Net Neutrality laws.
 
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Bev, Champion

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I Hope so Craig. I'd hate to see packages required to get the sites I want. Now a partnership with video providers, a music service and such, sure, but, don't restrict access to sites based on the service plan you have.
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Judge and Jury

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I'd hate to see packages required to get the sites I want.
That would be a death-blow to Viasat.  I won't mind the so-called "Express lanes" that make sure certain things always work their best as long as the regular, rated speed of the service plan is always there.
 
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John Rothgeb

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Technically satellite ISPs were never covered under Net Neutrality as they could prove that they needed the ability to impose caps and throttle connections when needed to maintain network stability. I believe that Viasat 2 will provide performance which is truly competitive with many land based ISPs.

I want to thank everyone for their comments on this Post. I learned a lot. I used the Satellite Look Angle Calculator, <http://www.groundcontrol.com/Satellite_Look_Angle_Calculator.htm> to determine that I have clear LOS to Viasat 2. It's OKAY with me if you split up the service packages into pieces as long as the total of all the pieces for ~50 Mbps with unlimited download comes in under $100. I hope that the speed for small business's websites will not be disadvantaged. I am looking forward to Viasat 3.