Data Usage

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I have both Glasswire and an Asus router to measure my data consumption.
I used each one to measure my data from 12:00 noon yesterday until 12:00 noon today.
Here is the Asus measurement on my Windows 7 PC for this period.



Here is the Glasswire measurement for the same device for the same duration.



The Asus router reports that 220.17 Mb of data transferred during this period for the PC.
Glasswire reports that 275 Mb of external data transferred during this period with an additional 244.1 Mb local data for a total of 519.2 Mb.

That represents a 25% difference measuring the same device during the same period.

What might be causing this this and is either of these measurements more likely to be correct?
Thanks.
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M.E.M.

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Posted 3 months ago

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M.E.M.

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I forgot one other thing. For those of you who have both Glasswire and an Asus router, perhaps you could run your own similar test and post the results here.
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Russtytrucker

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45 Mb is a small amount of data, could be a slight difference in clocks between glasswire and asus. I would not worry about it.
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Oliver

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Glasswire might be reporting the over head. for tcp it can be as much as 20% of traffic, just your computer and the server on the other side saying yes I got the data. Some bandwidth monitors dont count this "overhead".
(Edited)
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GabeU, Champion

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M.E.M.,

With the ASUS router you're counting data from 12PM on 8/3 to 12PM on 8/4.  That's 24 hours.  With Glasswire you're counting data from 12:03PM on 8/3 to 11:59PM on 8/4.  That's nearly midnight, and that's nearly 36 hours.  The 11:59 on 8/4 is PM, not AM.  You have to fix your end time for Glasswire.  
(Edited)
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Old Labs (VS1-329)

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Glasswire erroneously classifies some traffic as external that is in fact local (always has for some traffic types and they eventually get around to correcting them as they are identified). See:

https://forum.glasswire.com/t/glasswire-detecting-ssdp-and-llmnr-as-external-traffic/4635   

In this case, at least two of them show up in your Glasswire screen capture that just about equal the discrepancy. Filter to display only external traffic to verify if 239.255.255.250 and ff02::c are showing as external (the icons suggest they are and both do display as external for me). Further investigation of mine actually showed that ff02::c is in fact double counted and included in the 239.255.255.250 count!

In the past, VPN traffic was counted twice also - not sure if corrected but depended on how the VPN client was implemented (some implement the client as a virtual network adapter so bothe the real an virtual adpaters were being counted as I recall).

FWIW, my RT-AC3200 router's statistics tend to be more accurate than Glasswire's but both always seem to exceed Viasat's counts even when accounting for free zone usage. Given Viasat's web acceleration and compression of non-secured web traffic at the modem level that is what I would expect anyway.



(Edited)
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Old Labs (VS1-329)

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P.S. Also note that it appears the ASUS uses KiB, MiB and GiB rather than KB, MB and GB (at least on the traffic monitor when changing the scale):

  • 1 KiB = 1024 Bytes
  • 1 MiB = 1024 * 1024 Bytes
  • 1 GiB = 1024 * 1024 * 1024 Bytes
Whereas Viasat uses KB, MB, GB:

  • 1 KB = 1000 Bytes
  • 1 MB = 1000 * 1000 Bytes
  • 1 GB = 1000 * 1000 * 1000 Bytes

Close enough for gubmint work I guess if looking for other possible discrepancies.
(Edited)
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M.E.M.

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I never heard of a KiB, MiB, or GiB. Then again, I received my engineering degrees before the computer was in widespread use. Back then I solved problems using a slide rule.
However, 1 GiB = 1.074 GB using your definitions. So Asus automatically will report usage that is 7.4% higher than Viasat even though they would be in perfect agreement.
Regarding Glasswire mis-classifying external and internal data means that I should not even try to include it in any reconciliation of data with Viasat.

It may well prove to be that those of us who have been suspicious of Viasat's method of charging for data has been unfounded. We can blame all these phantom but real data transactions foisted upon us an army of programmers. For instance, I just found out that my smart TV (or PlayOn server) is sending data to the web when I am watching a PlayOn movie that is cast only locally. Thankfully, that data is small but I assume PlayOn, Netflix, Amazon, PBS, etc. want a record of what I watch.

Nevertheless, I am a numbers guy with time on my hands. Any entertainment is too far away. Viasat's monthly data measurements for me began at 12:00 midnight on August 4. If I can manage to be awake at some future midnight I plan to measure all three metrics for the same time duration. All three utilities seem to be capable of this.
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GabeU, Champion

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In fact, my post occurred yesterday around noontime, 12 hours before Glasswire's stated end time.
Missed that.  5:15PM UTC, which is when you posted, is 12:15PM EST.  
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Old Labs (VS1-329)

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The gibibytes vs gigabytes issue may simply be a display issue with Asus - even internal to just the Asus router I see a discrepancy in totals between the Traffic Monitor and Traffic Analyzer functionality. Probably two different programmers counting different things. Probably more so the case when comparing what Glasswire counts and what Viasat counts - none on them can give you a definitive answer as to what's being counted - other than to say a byte is a byte.

I use them all only as a rough order of magnitude within a reasonable margin of error. Primarily relying on the router's traffic analyzer now since I can clear it out every month to coincide with my reset date - the traffic monitor doesn't persist with reboots or power outages.

As long as the router is greater than Viasat's count I'm good with it (but in my case it's pretty close).
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M.E.M.

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Update:

I have been trying to figure out why my Windows 7 data usage has been so high with mysterious connections. One particularly egregious culprit was "Host Process for Windows" connecting to  IP 239.255.255.250. 

This problem seemed to begin with the upgrade of my router to the Asus RT-3200. This problem did not occur when I bypassed the router and connected the Windows 7 PC directly to the Viasat modem. 

By trial and error, I changed the network adapter properties from "Auto Negotiate" to "100 mbps half duplex". 

Preliminary results indicate that this action virtually eliminated my daily consumption of data to and from this site, which had averaged about 80 mb per day. This may not sound like too much at first, but it represents 20% of my 12GB allotment, when expanded to an entire month.
This step also solved my problem of the red "X" appearing many times per minute (and lasting about 10 seconds each) over the network internet access icon.

Most of you probably are not concerned or effected by this situation. However, for the small minority of users who do have this problem, you may want to try out my solution.