Cost to build satellites and launch them: Viasat vs Starlink vs OneWeb

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I found this info on one of the other technical space forums. I Googled a few articles to check the costs for satellites and it all appeared accurate. The info below would indicate a significant cost advantage for SpaceX Starlink over Viasat 3 and OneWeb.

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A little comparison of capacity costs between Viasat, OneWeb, and Starlink:

-Viasat 2 has a throughput of 260 GBps, and had a cost of $600 million, giving an installed capacity cost of ~$2,300,000/GBps.

-Viasat 3 satellites are expected to cost around $700m total per satellite (including launch cost), and have an impressive capacity of 1TBps. This gives an installed capacity cost of ~$700,000/GBps for the next gen Viasat 3.

-OneWeb satellites have a throughput of 8 GBps and have a cost target of $500k per satellite, launched on Soyuz gives a per-satellite launch cost of $2.5m. Put all of these together and you have an installed of around ~$300,000/GBps. If you factor in the lower possible capacity factor from time over the ocean, this is not much better than what Viasat 3 should be able to do.

-Starlink satellites have an estimated launch + manufacturing cost of about $500k, with the launch costing more than the satellites. With a throughput of 20 GBps, this gives and installed capacity cost of ~$25,000/GBps. Now, since the launch cost dominates the total cost, adding Starship to the picture should more than halve this. They are currently producing satellites at annual rate of around 1,500 per year... quadruple this (which is what you'd need to do to get a 30,000 satellite constellation), and I see no reason that Starlink's installed cost shouldn't drop below $10,000/GBps.

In short, $/GBps installed:

$2,300,000 Viasat 2
$700,000 Viasat 3
$300,000 OneWeb phase 1
$25,000 Starlink
$10,000 Starlink w/Starship

EchoStar HughesNet with their Jupiter-3 satellite at 500 Gbps has even worse financial metrics than Viasat 3.

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Jay

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Posted 3 months ago

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GabeU, Champion

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Are you invested in, or employed by, Starlink?  I'm just curious, as you seem to have quite an interest in advertising them.  
(Edited)
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Jay

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I am a Viasat customer. I hate it and plan to switch ASAP.

I am short Viasat and EchoStar HughesNet stock because I think both of their business models are likely to fail with the coming of OneWeb and Starlink. 

The cost advantages SpaceX has in terms of launch cost, total capacity, lower latency, etc. It all adds up to a significant advantage.

If I cannot invest yet in Starlink, the other way to make money on this situation is to short Viasat (VSAT) and EchoStar (SATS). They are both overvalued anyway with this overall overvalued market.
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Oliver

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You forgot to deduct the money the FCC gives Viasat back for providing "broadband" and you need to list all speeds of Viasat satellites as "up to".
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Voyager

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It will be curious to see if Starlink really can hit those throughput projections. However, I agree that their costs will almost certainly be lower than GEO satellites and the latency reduction itself is a huge win for LEO. I want to see how well the satellite switching and ground antennas will work in practice. I know in theory it isn’t much different than today’s cellular technology, but when the distances are hundreds of miles through the atmosphere rather than 10 miles or less as for cellular, the challenge is much greataer.
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Jay

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GEO satellites are at 35,786 km.
Starlink satellites are at 328 km to 580 km.

I suspect it is already solved, otherwise they would not be launching ever 2-3 weeks. They have been testing with two satellites, Tintin A & B, since February 2018.

https://www.space.com/39785-spacex-internet-satellites-starlink-constellation.html
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ExSatUser

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Will at work at some point? Most likely. Will it work in the timeline being proposed? I am highly skeptical.
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Jay

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If there were technical issues with Starlink, they wouldn't be launching all of these satellites every 2-3 weeks. They have been working on Starlink technology for many years. They filed patents on their phased array antenna design back in 2018. They also hired away a team from Broadcom to design and build the chips. Odds are they have it figured out, otherwise they wouldn't be launching.
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ExSatUser

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Testing in a small sample size is entirely different than serving internet to hundreds of thousands of people.
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Admiral Korbohuta

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More like billions of people they way Elon is talking about it.
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ExSatUser

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And 150 million people in the United States have been killed by guns.
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Jay

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Yeah, I am sure those engineers at SpaceX, the guys that land rockets on boats, they surely forgot a bunch of key steps in how to build a satellite constellation and make it work.

We all know those SpaceX engineers are clueless.

And Elon, the guy who founded Paypal, Tesla and SpaceX (landing rockets and launching cars into orbit), is overrated. What the hell has he ever done !!! What an idiot.
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ExSatUser

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Again, given his latest taste in women. I would question his judgement!

Seriously though. No matter how smart. No matter how prepared, expect problems with new technology. Ask NASA how things went with Apollo.
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Jay

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Yeah, look at all of the problems Viasat is having with their next gen Viasat 3 satellites. Massively delayed. 
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ExSatUser

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As was Viasat-1 and Viasat-2 also had failures.