Are there better WiFi settings?

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  • Updated 3 days ago
Wired works well, WiFi stinks!

I get decent speeds (typically in the 20-23 meg range) on my wired connections but dismal WiFi speeds (maybe 1 meg if I’m lucky)

Has anyone got any config suggestions to get the WiFi to behave?
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Wes Menzel

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Posted 3 months ago

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Jim16, Champion

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That is an issue some people are seeing on the wi-fi modems.  Either it is an equipment problem or a weak wi-fi range problem.  You are probably better off to disable the wi-fi and use your own router.  Someone will need to post how this is done, my fingers are getting tired.
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Wes Menzel

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Maybe I'll try that...what have I got to lose? ;)
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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Is there anything that might affect the signal (multiple level home, thick walls, ect)? 

Jim's link will be a good option if not. Some also have resorted to using a wifi extender. Location makes a pretty big difference and some of the factors above will alter the signal
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Harvey Mueller

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I've seen issues re: range of signal for Exede modem so I disabled the wireless and added my own Linksys EA6350 AC1200+ modem in cascade mode.  Initially I tried adding the modem and it's own config added anything connected to it in the 10.xx.xx.xx realm.  All is well for each device accessing the internet but for example I have a Ethernet connected printer and if it is plugged into the Exede modem, PC's connected to the Linksys router can't print.  I came across the Linksys paper below on cascading routers and now all is well.  I disabled wireless on the Exede modem and turned off DHCP on the Linksys router so now 2 PC's, 1 network printer, NAS storage are now on the same subnetwork and share data and resources regardless of which device they are plugged into as they are all on the 192.168.1.xx subnetwork. 

The directions below refer to a Linksys router but the concept is the same for every router.  Additionally I can access the Exede router at 192.168.1.1 and the Linksys router at 192.168.1.2 from and PC whether connected to The Exede router or the Linksys router. 


Step by step here:  https://www.linksys.com/us/support-article?articleNum=132275
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Oliver

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wifi modem default is 20mhz width, change to 40mhz width should double wifi bandwidth. 
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Jab

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RE: Harvey "... I disabled the wireless and added my own Linksys EA6350 AC1200+ modem in cascade mode"

So, these instructions were used: Cascading (Connecting) a Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Router

If so, could you post results from a ipconfig DOS command, as they have shown?

thx
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Harvey Mueller

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Here ya go.  I used the directions for a LAN-LAN bridge. 

JAB, I went by directions in article 132275 and not article 140371 in your link.  Good luck


(Edited)
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wm4bama, Champion

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Look through the router menu for any Quality Of Service (QOS) option and disable it if you can..QOS does not work well with satellite internet..the inherent latency of satellite signals confuses QOS and slows your service..I had the same problem with my D-Link router until I disabled QOS.
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James E Hart

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Greetings Boomer... The Wireless side of the ViaSat Modem/Router uses the Wireless N standard which was made obsolete sometime in 2012 when the Wireless A/C Standard arrived. The ViaSat modem instructions manual shows how to turn off (Disable) the Wifi signal on your ViaSat Modem/Router. Once that's done just plug in a newer standard wireless A/C router into one of the four ethernet ports on your ViaSat Modem and you wireless speeds should triple. Worked great for us. We're using an Apple Airport Extreme. Our wireless speeds are awesome! Best of luck!
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Leslie Faretty

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Hello All,

I struggle with the WiFi signal in my house (1300 sq ft); I like what you said, James about disabling the modem's WiFi and plugging in a new router. I am wondering if the following would be an option (we're not an Apple House ;) ) for me: TP-Link Archer AC1900 Smart WiFi Router - Dual-Band Gigabit (C9). I'm on a tight budget which might limit my options. I work from home and really need to get this figured out soon. 

Thank you in advance for any advice/help!
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James E Hart

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Greetings Leslie... your TP-Link AC1900 Wireless Router will be an enormous improvement in speed over the old Wireless N WiFi standard that’s built into the ViaSat modern/router. You can disable the WiFi side of the ViaSat Modem in settings, then plug your TP-Link AC1900 into one of the Ethernet ports on the ViaSat and connect your wireless devices to the AC1900. You’ll also have additional Ethernet ports available because your can use them on both modem/routers. Have fun!
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James E Hart

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Greetings Judge & Jury.... Not sure and thinking you may be more educated on this stuff than I, but since DHCP assigns dynamic IP addresses to devices on the network and a device can have a different IP address every time it connects to the network I'm wondering if it matters? I know a device's IP address can even change while it's still connected. I assigned a spacific Network Name to the Apple AirPort Extreme Router connected to my ViaSat Modem's Ethernet port, and now all my wired & WiFi connections are seeing & connecting to that Network. Regards!
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Harvey Mueller

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If you just plug a wifi router in, you will have DHCP running on both the modem and the router. Not sure about Apple but Linksys DHCP assigns IP addresses in the 10.x.x.x range while the modem continues to assign addresses in 192.168.1.100 to 192.168.1.149 range.
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James E Hart

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Thanks Harvey! Thinking the Apple Airport is about the same as any other high end AC router just more expensive... when will I learn? Regards, Jim
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Harvey Mueller

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You can run ipconfig /all on a device attached to the Airport to see what address it is using.
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James Hart

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Hi Harvey... Normally do all the Network administration on the Mac. But it's similar. On the Mac you go to the terminal window and type IFCONFIG -a to get the same result. For any Mac users out there running Apple routers, the Apple Airport Utility shows you the entire Network, addresses, etc. in an easy to read format. Regards All.