And the sad story continues....

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And the sad story continues....7 days ago I contact Support and Customer Service to inform them that my speed tests are showing less than 1 download and only 3 upload......I check again this morning and the same speeds are being recorded.....does anyone else out there believe that Viasat is the worst internet provider EVER!! I do think it's amazing how they have no problem pulling a payment though...pretty efficient on their side anyway....And I think is amazing how one can have such low speeds on the receiving end and still burn over 10 GB of data in 7 days when I was gone 4 of those days.....now it's time to inform the BBB for me....
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Allen Taylor

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Posted 3 months ago

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Stephen Rice, Champion

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I don't think Viasat is the worst ISP ever. I am paying for up to 12 mbps and my speed is 19 mbps this morning.


It sounds like something pulled an update while you were away from home. My laptop mysteriously upgraded to a newer version of Google Chrome without my permission. I thought I had all updates disabled but I guess I was wrong.


I have a Roku that stays online 24/7 as well. Sometimes it does updates without my permission too.


Just because you aren't home, it doesn't mean your devices will stop using data completely.


Does your house stop using electricity when you go out of town?


(Edited)
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GabeU, Champion

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Luckily, I've never experienced that problem.  I think I just got into the habit of unplugging it due to always doing the same with the computer.  With it not having an on/off switch all I could do was to unplug it.  I actually thought it's what everyone did.  It wasn't until years later that I realized that not many people did/do the same.  
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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My modem and router are on 24/7/365 - whatever is going to use data, whether legitimately or illegitimately, is going to do so whether I'm physically present or not. I simply let my devices sleep when I step away and have them configured to not wake up to any other stimulus (e.g. wake on LAN, scheduled task, a dog brushing the keyboard or mouse with his tail, etc.)

Only one unexplained data loss circa October 2012, plenty of "unexpected" data losses since that time but all legitimate after tracking them down with router and traffic monitoring - none occurred when modem and router were on and the devices were sleeping properly, they did occur while I was present or walked away without putting the device to sleep and after tracking them down they don't re-occur or I minimize the data loss. Even when I walked away without sleeping, I suspect they would have occurred on my return had I not forgotten to sleep ( I suspect the same unexpected losses would have still occurred after powering everything on if I were to use that methodology - i.e. it would simply defer the data loss - not I do occasionally (rarely) use that but only for verifying delayed usage count accuracy).

Understanding how data is used without your knowledge is probably more effective in controlling your usage and taking the right steps to eliminate unwanted usage and the bloat of today's web - yes, it's a lot of work to track it.

If it's easier and  makes you feel better or more confident to power off, go right ahead.

Even that yields complaints around here when folks fail to account for the delayed usage reporting that occurs - e.g. I went to bed, checked my data usage and overnight I used 1GB of data when the modem was off - no you probably used 1 GB of data before you turned the modem off that had not been reported but was reported shortly after you turned the modem back on...   

James should be along any minute now to recommend cutting off the Ethernet cable and calling the FBI ;)
(Edited)
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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In late 2012/early 2013 that is when Exede had a lot of unexplained meter issues. Something like a modem looping issues where the modem would just sit and spin and burn data by itself.
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GabeU, Champion

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In late 2012/early 2013 that is when Exede had a lot of unexplained meter issues. Something like a modem looping issues where the modem would just sit and spin and burn data by itself.
Sounds like HughesNet's HT1000 modem.  They had instances of that happening with that modem, though they upgraded the software fairly quickly, from what I understand.  I guess it affected enough people to notice, though.  
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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For Viasat, I think it impacted people with low SNR's because of being on the beams edge (like me).

It took weeks and months to get the issue resolved.
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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Up to 3 Mbps upload is the advertised speed, less than 1 Mbps download at all times is not normal.

Which modem? There are 3 different ones. Are you accessing via wireless (WiFi) or a wired (LAN) connection using a Viasat modem/router combo device? What devices connect to your router either way? What steps have you taken to track/monitor data usage for each device? The questions continue on from there...

Some indicate their slow speeds are eliminated using a more capable wireless router than the Viasat combo device or even using a wired connection. A more capable router also can provide better traffic monitoring capabilties to verify you data usage against Viasat's claims.  Others indicate that some tweaking of the router's WiFi settings yields relief.   

This is a customer-to-customer self help forum - we can only offer suggestions based on what specifics you tell us about your own unique environment. But you're free to complain here also.

BBB doesn't do anything but go ahead anyway  - they simply provide ratings based on how well a company responds to complaints. Viasat currently as an A+ BBB Rating despite reviews averaging 1 star - it only means the respond well to complains submitted through BBB (resolutions go both ways in favor and against).      
(Edited)
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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The original poster never said he wanted a resolution.  He just came here to bash an amazing product.  

He could be experiencing equipment failure, or he may have simply used up all of his priority data.  The world will never know.
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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Which is what I was implying ;) He's free to come here looking for peer support or to complain... he'll receive replies and engagement either way.  I'd prefer the former rather than latter. He's new and like most newbies isn't familiar with what should be this community's real purpose - self help.

Like most it appears he's coming here after a bad experience with phone support.

If he responds with a better problem description and some details we'll know his real intent.
(Edited)
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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Amazing product? Not sure I would go that far.
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Stephen Rice, Champion

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It funny how people complain and say 1 to 3 mbps upload is slow though.  When I was on DSL, my upload speed was 256 kbps.
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Chaim Isaac Lipschitz

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How about some empathy for their predicament. They have probably not had months or years to get used to the idiosyncrasies of Viasat.

Neither we nor they probably know whether their problem is due to congestion, a bad install, or defective equipment.

If it is congestion, then no user or installer can fix this problem. Only Viasat can by changing their business model.
If it is a bad install, then they have to keep pressure on Viasat to find a qualified installer to correct the problem. As a first step, I would suggest that any SNR on VS1 on a sunny day that is consistently less than 4 is probably a bad install, although my connectivity is still functional at an SNR of 2. Higher that 7 is ideal.
If it is defective equipment, then they need to have Viasat replace it for free. Defective equipment is probably the least likely of the three.

Congestion is an issue that we often assume. Yet we have no real way of knowing this. We do not have the ability to measure congestion. Only Viasat does. I have never seen any information of beam loading as a function of capacity.

We continually see people post here who are disappointed with d/l speeds that we think are acceptable. Whose fault is that? They have been led to believe that they can expect 12 mbps or more. Very few people read the fine print before signing up. It is only after their disappointments that they become aware of the fine print.
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Chaim Isaac Lipschitz

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"I agree, but remember that anyone who is a regular reader here has heard the same story probably a thousand times!"
That is true. Their issues should be solved outside of this forum by customer service. That is one of the the purposes of customer service.
In that case, this forum would be more useful to the serious forum users. It would also have a lot fewer posts.
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GabeU, Champion

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Congestion is an issue that we often assume. Yet we have no real way of knowing this. 
Congestion gives indications in many ways.  One is very adequate speed, but a stream not performing properly.  Another is speed testing that shows variances of each test.   If your overall speed is decent, but the variances looks like the Rocky Mountains, that's congestion.   Congestion has fairly universal signatures.  

Congestion is often a reality, not an assumption, especially on a system that has a finite throughput that is considerably smaller than ground based services.  
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Chaim Isaac Lipschitz

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"Isn't a low download speed coupled with a high upload speed an indication of congestion?"
May be. Maybe not.
Although congestion and throttling have the same end result, The causes are different.
Congestion is like being on a highway that has stop and go traffic. There are too many people for the conduit.
Throttling is like someone installing a governor on your car. The highway is fine but you can't go faster than 30 mph no matter how hard you press on the accelerator.
A user should try to figure out which of these, if any, is part of his problem.
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GabeU, Champion

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Although congestion and throttling have the same end result 
Sometimes the end results of the two are quite different.  Though it's lowered, throttling can still result in a steady speed, whereas congestion often results in a speed that is "choppy", for lack of a better term.  

What I mean is, if one where to have their speed throttled to 5Mbps, they may very well be able to stream without issue, whereas that same lower speed of 5Mbps, but as a result of congestion, would most likely cause all sorts of buffering, even in the much lower definitions.  The reason, of course, being that the former's speed of 5Mbps would probably be nice and steady, as mentioned above, whereas the latter's speed of 5Mbps would only be the average of a service speed that's all over the place.  

I've known people with HughesNet that have been able to stream in 720p when they're in FAP and are throttled to a speed of around 3Mbps, whereas when I have plenty of data and my speed is higher than 3Mbps, but I'm experiencing awful congestion, I'm lucky if I can watch a 144p clip for five more than five  seconds before it starts buffering.  

Granted, that's a different service, but when it comes to considerable congestion, and the results of it when it happens, HughesNet and ViaSat are like twins.  
(Edited)
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NewMexicoMountains

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Every ISP I've encountered advertises speeds "up to", with no guarantees. This hardly unique to Viasat. I've had Comcast in the past and virtually never received the advertised speed. I currently have CenturyLink DSL (at a different location). I ordered 60Mbps service, but by the time the installer arrived he couldn't find a circuit to provision 60Mpbs so I was provisioned with 40Mbps, and typically see more like 25-30 Mbps on speedtests. About a year after getting this service CenturyLink noticed they had not provisioned the line at the requested speed and wanted to refund the difference back to the start date. Since I ordered the 60Mbps online, I was paying the same as the 40Mbps service, but with a lifetime price guarantee. I had to convince them I wanted to keep paying for 60Mbps service against the day I'll be able to actually get it
:-)