An all time new low speed for me has been reached!

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  • Problem
  • Updated 1 year ago
  • Acknowledged
  • (Edited)

9:00pm on Tuesday, the 22nd....

Download :: 38 kbps


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VeteranSatUser, Champion

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Posted 1 year ago

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Tres Bien

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The one thing that I do not understand in all of this is this.  How does any company or business entity operate according to a premise that the customer is obligated to pay regardless of the service received and the business entity is never obligated to ever provide any service if it so chooses which is by any measure the essence of the "up to [such and such a speed]" argument?

Some time back I upgraded from HughesNet Gen4 to Gen5.  My service immediately when from quite nice to mostly kb/s with brief intermittent up to 40Mb/s.  The brief periods of decent speeds were so brief and intermittent so as to be irrelevant.  After about of month of me compiling over a hundred speed tests and numerous technical exchanges with support folks, Hughes agreed that there is indeed a reasonable speed  that customers are entitled to which they were unable provide and cut me loose from my contract without any nastiness whatsoever.

Viasat's apparent contention that any crappy service is perfectly acceptable based on their stated policy or obligation to provide only "up to" certain connection speeds is, in my humble opinion, a possible class action suit in the making - especially in light of the fact that half [so to speak] of the satellite internet industry has established a precedent and perhaps, de facto standard for reasonable minimum service.

This lead balloon cannot fly forever.  Somebody upstairs needs to take a course in customer service:earnings ratios or better yet, make a quick study of Dyson - those folks print their internet url and customer support phone number right on their products and they're hauling the results to the bank.
(Edited)
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Andy Schack

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Well put.

Andy
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Bev, Champion

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Yes, except that if you read out customer agreement, we can't do the class action thing either. There is a channel for disputes and legal proceedings available to us but, class action isn't it, we each agreed not to do that when we got Viasat service.

I know for a fact Viasat will look at an individual account and, if the situation warrants, after they investigate it and, with the patient cooperation of the customer, do all they can to fix the service, in a few rare cases the ETF can be waived.

That stuff is case by case just like it was for you with HughesNet.
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Tres Bien

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I love that word, "can't".  From kids to tech support service personnel, the absurdity of its meaning is repeatedly lost in the frenzy of the moment.  It used to make my blood boil.  Now, it just makes me chuckle.

And then, there all those lovely words to describe our absolute grasp of the realities of the Universe, FACT-REAL-KNOW-TRUE.  To see them compounded together, "know for a fact", is to experience logic nirvana.  "True beyond a reasonable doubt", they insisted as the Sun obviously continued to circle the Earth.  Absolutes are comforting, I reckon; we probably "can't handle the truth" of the illusion of knowledge.

The entirety of life is "case by case", but the rule is not established by the exceptions; to wit, our local satellite internet installer has reported that Hughes is lettin' 'em off by the droves [not without due course, of course] as it seems they have a major software "glitch" resulting in major congestion.  I can't verify this but it makes for an interesting story.

The problem as always with the party line is that unless it is built on integrity, commitment, and community, the stories that are used for cover are vapid and ultimately transparent.

I can only conclude, after following Viasat for only a part of a year, that "we" (the civilian customers) aren't paying the bills; we're just window dressing for a much more expansive enterprise.  For many of us, however, they are The Only game in town.  But I speculate and meander...
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Bev, Champion

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I think we are a bit more than widow dressing but, relatively few customers actually interact with corporate. Most only contact the call center if there is a problem. They do listen to us, when we are saying more than just ranting about this or that with our service.

True, the airlines and government contracts are bigger than we are but, they act collectively, as a group. We don't for the most part. Viasat might here ideas and honest problems (not just slow because you're out of priority data) from a few of us. Of those few, only a few of that group are willing to be patient, listen and work with Viasat to try to at least find the cause of the problem and, in most cases get it fixed.

If we all could get together and interact with Viasat sensibly and with mutual respect, we'd all be heard better. Unfortunately humans are humans and, that is unlikely to ever happen.
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Russtytrucker

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The only thing that really fixes situations like this is competition. Hopefully more will come along soon.  I still like living out in the country.