100MBPS INTERNET WITH VIASAT 2???

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austin kastner

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  • t

Posted 2 years ago

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Alex, Viasat Corporate Communications

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While we haven't yet determined what our speeds and plans will look like with the new satellite, we're pretty sure we'll offer at least 25 Mbps download speeds from coast to coast, with faster options likely available in some areas. We'll let you know as soon as we do, but it won't be until sometime this fall.
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Deku (The #1 Hero Data Saver), Champion

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i hope the data cap is like 250gbs or maybe 350gbs or maybe 300gbs is good enough but either way its fine with me :3
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austin kastner

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I hope they have bigger plans too
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austin kastner

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I just figured out I could use Evst to see how exedes Network is doing link is https://myssoapps.exede.net/federatio...
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Deb

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Alex,

I think I can speak for the vast majority if not 100% of the customers that, when you state Exede will offer at least 25 Mbps download speeds from coast to coast, it truly means 25 Mbps during peak times when folks really want to watch and stream videos. Can you comment on that?
Also, with that said, the data allotment will no doubt have to be bumped up to support this if indeed Exede can deliver 25 mbps during peak  viewing times.
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Alex, Viasat Corporate Communications

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Hi Deb,
It's difficult to say with 100% certainty what speeds will be like for any ISP network at any given time. More people on the network at a given time (like a peak period) can create congestion that can lower speeds. Just because you built a highway with 10 lanes doesn't mean you'll always get to go 65 mph (see LA). That said, the more capacity we add with more powerful satellites means the likelihood of congestion is reduced. If you think about our ViaSat-1 satellite having 140 Gbps of capacity and ViaSat-2 having more than 300 Gbps, we're going from 140 to 440 Gbps, which is an increase of (hold on while I consult with my handy-dandy percentage calculator site) 142%! This new satellite also has some unique capabilities around capacity shifting, which will allow us to 'point' capacity where it's needed. That will give us even greater ability to mitigate the conditions that cause congestion issues.

As to data, we will absolutely have more robust plans, with many areas having plans similar to or even greater than our popular 150 GB Freedom Plan. If you look at the 'unlimited' cellphone plans that have been rolled out recently, you can see where things are going: You get the data you need to stream in something close to unlimited fashion, but you also agree to have your video quality reduced if you exceed a certain threshold (for many of these phone plans, it's 20 GB or so). Managing video data is key to our ability to provide service that feels unlimited for most people. People don't want to have to worry about data, and our goal is to create plans that accomplish that. We'll also likely still have plans similar to what we have today for folks who want to pay less for a capped plan. 

More details to come!
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les

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 this sounds great -
I do hope the data limit is raised. at at our current plan we can watch video very nicely [roku is great] but the data limitation prevents us from watching movies.
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James Jackson

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Going from 140 Gbps to 440 Gbps is actually a 314% increase.
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Grumpyoldman

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Sorry the increase is 300gbs (440 -140) so the % increase is (300/140) * 100 which is 214.3%  rounded to the nearest tenth.

Or to put it in English the % of increase cannot include the original bandwidth.
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James Jackson

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I'm no mathematician, but when I multiply the original 140 Gbps * 214.3% I get 300 Gbps which is only the capacity of Viasat 2.  The combined total of both satellites will be 440 Gbps.  140 * 314.3% = 440.  Put another way, the total new capacity will be 440 Gbps divided by the original 140 Gbps gives you  3.143 * 100 = 314.3%.  Viasat 2 has 214.3% more capacity than Viasat 1, but the capacity of the two satellites together will be 314.3% higher because we're not losing the capacity of Viasat 1.

Either way, it's a very welcome, large, increase that I hope will provide us with much higher data caps at more reasonable prices.  Higher bandwidth is not as important to me, although a more consistent 12-15 Mbps would be nice.  Any higher than that is just gravy.
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Grumpyoldman

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"I'm no mathematician, but when I multiply the original 140 Gbps * 214.3% I get 300 Gbps which is only the capacity of Viasat 2."

Yep that's right!!!!!  And that is what is going to be ADDED to the current bandwidth. I went back to Brads post to make sure he was talking increase and Percentages and verified he was.
You take my numbers (%increase (214.3%) in Gbps )300 +( existing  Gpbs )140 = 440GBps. And that's a fact! I never questioned the final bandwidth value and the way I do the calculation supports 440Gbps. But the INCREASE is Still 214.3%. Percents can be tricky at times.
(Edited)
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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Percents can be tricky at times.
You bet they can, I'm still trying to figure out where Alex got 142% from... ;)

I am a mathematician and as originally phrased it's 214.3%; however, I cheated and used:

http://www.marshu.com/articles/calculate-percentage-increase-decrease-percent-calculator.php 

But more importantly since nobody's asked recently, are we there yet Alex???
(Edited)
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Bev, Champion

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I'd be happy with the same plans but, one video service unlimited usage, be that DirecTv, Netflix, Vevo, YouTube, whatever, just one service we could stream unlimited (Assuming we subscribed, if it's a pay to view service.)
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les

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I also agree that our plan is ok and streams great, but the data limit prevents us from using our ISP to watch movies as they use a lot of data :(
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austin kastner

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I would like unlimited streaming
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Imma

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What will be the estimated upload speeds? 
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Diana, Viasat Employee

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Imma, we do not have that information yet.  We will share as soon as it is available.
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Aaron Moore

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What will happen to current subscribers, when new plans come along? After all, nobody wants to subscribe now and be stuck in an old, inferior, plan or situation.
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Old Labs (VS1-329-L12FZ)

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What will happen to current subscribers, when new plans come along? After all, nobody wants to subscribe now and be stuck in an old, inferior, plan or situation.
If history holds true, you'll have an opportunity to upgrade and move over to the new satellite. But no details have really been made available yet or whether there will be any charges associated since it will require an installer visit to at least re-aim the dish.

Being "stuck" on the old satellite may not be so bad (and some on the west coast without a line of sight to the new satellite may simply not be able to switch to the new satellite due to a lower elevation) - as more people switch to the new bird and its promise of better things, capacity will free up of the old satellite making things more bearable for those who stay.

Choose wisely for now... ViaSat hasn't announced its marketing plans just yet and it's unlikely they will until ready to unleash the new plans.
(Edited)
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Aaron Moore

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Thanks a ton for the advice! Best to wait for the new satellite!
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gm92066

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My past experience with Viasat is that they will ignore current subscribers and go after more new  subscribers to lock in that 2 years of revenue.
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Tim

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That's exactly what I am afraid of.....then we are once again stuck in the same doom loop. 12 to 25 mb down at peak times has to be a priority for Exede, or else they will lose more than they will gain in my opinion.
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Brad, Viasat Employee

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The thing to take into consideration is packages aside, this will free up a lot of bandwidth as we're doubling our ENTIRE capacity. Even if you don't get a signal from ViaSat 2 the workload will be shifted over and open the door to more robust plans and speed regardless which satellite you are pointed to. Everything done in the last 3 years Freedom Plan, Liberty Plans, Speedboost, ect all are on the same satellite and if some bandwidth gets shifted over and we have a lot more comfortable space we can improve the existing connection as a result.
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Aaron Moore

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Excellent info! I'll wait until the new satellite is available!